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Black Island: Dossier Tintin - L'île noire, Les tribulations d’une aventure

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jock123
Moderator
#1 · Posted: 29 Sep 2005 17:30 · Edited by: jock123
I thought I’d seen something about this here before, but having done a search I can’t find it now, so I thought I’d bring it up: on their web-site, Casterman are advertising a new product: Dossier Tintin - L'île noire. To be released on the 18th of November, it allows the reader to look at the variations which the story underwent.

The blurb says (approximately!):
The Black Island is the first album, acting as a spearhead to this new collection of studies. There are - alone amongst the 24 albums - three different versions of this work; moreover - and this isn’t well known - its pre-publication in the Petit XXème made use of flat tints and woven (?) colours on a great number of the pages. Chance also has it that the boards of the B&W version number 124, precisely double the 62 boards of the colour versions. Thus it’s "perfect" for reading: two boards in B&W from the pre-publication, opposite boards, exactly corresponding, of the two colour versions.

Sounds like a pretty exciting development!
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#2 · Posted: 29 Sep 2005 17:35
I believe this might be something that was announced around December last year - to which I referred at the end of the Review of the Year 2004. It's a really exciting development and I'll certainly be getting a copy, if only to make up for there not being a volume of Chronologie out this year!

Ed
jock123
Moderator
#3 · Posted: 29 Sep 2005 19:46
Credit to you Ed! I knew it was suggested somewhere on here, I just couldn’t find it!
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#4 · Posted: 29 Sep 2005 19:53
That said, it has a hefty price tag of 60 euros, and I do already own all three versions... but it seems that the first version will be presented as it appeared in Le Petit Vingtième (i.e. with occasional colouring) rather than the first entirely black-and-white book.

If they do this for all the adventures, we would finally be able to see the original versions of stories such as The Shooting Star, which to my knowledge have never been published (officially or otherwise) outside of their original magazine serialisation.

Ed
yamilah
Member
#5 · Posted: 8 Jan 2006 16:36
The book Dossier Tintin l'Ile Noire was available here as of November 2005.

see pictures on http://bd.casterman.com/isbn/2-203-01720-1/?r=castherg

It is great and confirms widely what has been said before, but it's 30cm x 38cm size hardly matches with my bookshelves! By the way, I found that 'aplat & trame' = tint area & halftone (see http://www.answers.com/halftone for picture)

Here the press and the booksellers unanimously mentioned the official assertion (p.27) that relativizes the alleged pressure put on Herge by Methuen to have The Black Island redrawn. In other words, Herge had plans to draw his new 'Ile Noire' well before taking advice from the British, who consequently did not really "initiated the transformation of the rather quaint and naive 'L'Ile Noir'* (sic) of 1937"!
(see http://www.tintinologist.org/articles/blackisland.html )

Was this information a real surprise in Britain, as it was here?

PS: Why don't the French accents appear any more on this site? They were a few days ago...

* About 'L'Ile Noir' (without ^ & e), see also
http://www.tintinologist.org/forums/index.php?action=vthread&forum=8&topic=909&page=0#1
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#6 · Posted: 8 Jan 2006 17:38
Agreed, I found it very nicely put together, though perhaps a later volume dealing with a book that has 'unpublished' original material might be a more worthwhile purchase. For those who already own the three versions of The Black Island, it's interesting but perhaps not essential...

Herge had plans to draw his new 'Ile Noire' well before taking advice from the British

I think this rumour was going around at about the time of Pierre Assouline's biography (1998), but this new book is the first I can think of to explicity state it. It also begs the question: did Hergé also intend to redraw The Broken Ear, both the original b/w and colour versions of which are roughly contemporaneous with those of The Black Island?

Ed
yamilah
Member
#7 · Posted: 8 Jan 2006 19:46
I can't wait for the "first good biography"! I expect we'll likely get some more correct and reexamined informations of that type.

The recent info about 1965' Ile Noire's renewal allows to infer that it was actually more important to Herge than to his readers, all the more as Tintin was still almost unknown in the British Isles at the time, and on top of it the book could be seen as a historical document on pre-war Britain!

What do people reckon overthere?

P.S. about your question concerning The Brocken Ear:
As far as one can 'guess', Herge had no reason to redraw the title lettering or the pages: only the cover image was slightly modified, possibly for artistic reasons, but who knows, with those weird 'password' covers!
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#8 · Posted: 9 Jan 2006 00:44
I picked up a copy of this book just this weekend (the wonder of Eurostar!) I suppose it is a slight extravagance if you already have the available editions but it's nice to have three versions laid out together for comparison and to see the Petit Vingtieme version with it's proto-colour.

I haven't had time to read/translate all the introductory text but what I have read so far has been interesting - there are about 30 extra pages of notes and illustrations with lots of info.

I believe the book shows that Hergé cared more about his English language editions than previously realised. One example given of Hergé's queries into the translation I found amusing "Page 42, B1 - 'Here's your tea, sir': it is not tea that the Hotelier carries to Tintin, it's his soup or dinner"

I can't quite fathom the explanation to this given in the notes (something about green peas?) but I expect the translators explained to Hergé that "tea" can also mean your evening meal, especially in Scotland. Ahh, such details...!
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#9 · Posted: 23 Mar 2006 10:36
According to objectiftintin.com, Etienne Pollet of Casterman has confirmed that the next in the Dossier Tintin series will be dedicated to The Secret of the Unicorn and Red Rackham's Treasure. Apparently it will publish the Le Soir strips of Unicorn and the Coeurs Valliants version of Rackham, which is the same as the Soir version but in colour.

Ed
chevet
Belgium Correspondent
#10 · Posted: 26 Mar 2006 18:49
In fact, this new "Dossier Tintin" will contain the strips of "Le Soir" of the two books and a color version of "Unicorn" published in Coeurs Vaillants (without permission).

The original information on Objectiftintin.com has been modified with details given in a mail by Mr Pollet.

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