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Alph-Art: Does Tintin die?

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midnightblueowl
Member
#1 · Posted: 5 Jan 2006 19:19
Did Herge intend to kill Tintin off in Alph-art? It's the greatest mystery in tintinology. Yves Rodier thought no, Ramo Nash thought yes, I personally think no - where's the commercial value if he can't write any more books - Casterman would never let him do it.
What do you think ?
sliat_1981
Member
#2 · Posted: 9 Jan 2006 08:51
The fact the he got a message to Snowy doubts that he was going to be killed off and even hints to who was going to save him. Even if he was to be killed off I doubt it would have happened midway through the book.
Charles
Member
#3 · Posted: 24 Jan 2006 18:02
I agree with sliat_1981, and I would add that after all of Tintin's adventures, escapades, and successful escapes, why would he succomb now? Our experience with Tintin has always been that he is eminently resourceful and resilient; why should this change?
mondrian
Member
#4 · Posted: 25 Jan 2006 10:29
And he has 20 (and a half) pages to get out of trouble. Most probably would have been threatened again, but not killed. It´s been argued that Hergé lost his idealism when he got older, but to an extent that he would kill Tintin? No.
dubbs
Member
#5 · Posted: 5 Feb 2006 13:36
I like to beleive Tintin does not escape. Whether Herge meant to kill him or not. It was also his wish that noone else draw Tintin after his death, I submit that Tintin does die, and that Alph-art was Tintin's final adventure.
sprabs
Member
#6 · Posted: 19 Feb 2006 16:27
A very simple fact will answer this topic.

INCLUDING Alph-art, try counting the no. of times...
(1)Tintin was locked up in a dungeon/prison
(2)Assasination attempts were made on Tintin
(3)Tintin was sentenced to death

Without actually counting, you can tell that it will be a huge no. of times that tintin encountered a dead end, only to be saved either by his own bright ideas (ex. prisoners of sun) or with the help of his trustworthy friends (ex. picaros).

Considering all that, it hardly seems to me that Herge would have killed Tintin or for that matter any of the characters of Tintin.

Anyway, Tintin(dead or alive) would always remain immortal amongst us - the fans of Tintin. Wouldnt he ...
andrea
Member
#7 · Posted: 28 Feb 2006 17:21
tintin does NOT DIE he is absolutely inviceable!!! but no one can draw/write tintin as herge!!! so the production just stops and if people do continue the books are just rubbish!!!
SingingGandalf
Member
#8 · Posted: 18 Mar 2006 09:49
tintin does NOT DIE he is absolutely inviceable!!! but no one can draw/write tintin as herge!!! so the production just stops and if people do continue the books are just rubbish!!!

Calm down there, andrea. Tintin is pretty much invincable. He wouldn't have been killed off. Do you think Herge would kill off his own son? Your right, noone can draw Tintin as Herge, but I wouldn't say the books are rubbish, have you read any of the proper pastiche ones like by Harry Edwards. No-way as good as Herge, but some come close to the drawing, but not necessarily the inventive wit. I mean, even the films, the plots in those were boring and really should have been written by Herge. But then, the plays written by Herge, were also not like any ordinary Tintin book.
yamilah
Member
#9 · Posted: 18 Apr 2006 16:52 · Edited by: yamilah
What can be said about Tintin's virtual death, in the light of his unique world*?

Whereas French sculptor Cesar's art normally consists in compressions (see http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C3%A9sar_Baldaccini ), in Alph-art Tintin is strangely supposed to have liquid polyester poured over him and to turn into an expansion (see http://ta-nea.dolnet.gr/data/D2005/D1209/1or23c.jpg ), likely in the way suggested by Rastapopoulos' cigar box in The Lake of Sharks (p.26), that expands after its duplication by Calculus' copying machine (p.27).

Thus Tintin's unseen final expansion kind of matches his creation via special writing means that recall Raymond Roussel's amplified mechanisms* (see Les Bijoux Ravis*).


* please search for related threads.
Richard
UK Correspondent
#10 · Posted: 18 Apr 2006 19:25
yamilah
Cesar's art normally consists in compressions... in Alph-art Tintin is strangely supposed to have liquid polyester poured over him and to turn into an expansion

In fairness César explored expansionism quite considerably; there's one of his expansions in the Centre Pompidou in Paris. I think Hergé just chose expansionism as it's something more unusual than being crushed - a little clichéd, perhaps? Although I suppose he may have been (sub?)consciously inspired by the Lake of Sharks film, that's something I'd never considered before.

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