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Red Sea Sharks: What does “Coke en Stock” mean?

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Harrock n roll
Moderator
#11 · Posted: 16 Jun 2004 17:07 · Edited by: Harrock n roll
Hergé could have called it "Land of Black Gold, part 2" or "Sea of Black Gold" - the "black gold" in this case referring to the traffick in black slaves.

Years ago, before I read this book, I used to ponder over the covers on the back of the books I had, and thought that the "sharks" referred to some kind of gang that Tintin was involved in or going to bust. Thinking about it now I think the title is a bit vague, but who cares? Great book!
xcalibur
Member
#12 · Posted: 3 Jul 2004 08:29
that means coke en stock means slave sellers...
I have one of the first books ever printed... Since 1946... :)

A little bit antique ;)
Martine
Member
#13 · Posted: 9 Oct 2004 23:25 · Edited by: Admin
The spanish title for it is 'Stock de Coque'...that doesn't make any sense.

--
[Post edited by Admin. Irrelevant remarks removed. Message to Martine: please stick to the topic.]
rastapopoulos
Member
#14 · Posted: 11 Oct 2004 10:35
I think Rastapopoulos or The Marquis di Gorgonzola would be reffered to as a Red Sea Shark!
kirthiboy
Member
#15 · Posted: 13 Oct 2004 22:30
Well, the covers always used to make me curious more than the titles. When I saw "The Blue Lotus" on the back of my "Red Sea Sharks", I thought Tintin fights a dragon in China. I was too young at that time. :p
Martine
Member
#16 · Posted: 14 Oct 2004 00:20
Heh-heh, good one.
I think all I noticed when I looked at the back of the books was that there was a listed title that had no picture (Land of the Soviets, but of course back then I had no idea what it was), and that Tintin changed fashions by the last book listed...(I was not only young, but also, a dummy)
finlay
Member
#17 · Posted: 14 Oct 2004 20:04
I always thought that a Lotus was a kind of dragon; it took me a while to realise that there were no dragons and not really much explicitly blue things, and that that was just the name of the opium den. I also didn't know what opium was, though I had the sense that it was illegal.

The Red Sea Sharks is my oldest book; it's falling apart and had to be stitched up, and my mum's name, written by her (or perhaps my grandma) when she was a young girl, is inside the front cover. And the back cover is also missing.
Richard
UK Correspondent
#18 · Posted: 14 Oct 2004 21:08
The one title that I guessed completely wrongly about was the Jo, Zette and Jocko book, "The Secret Ray". I was expecting it to be about some sort of stingray or fish - sort of like Harry Edwood's "Voice of the Lagoon".
Jyrki21
Member
#19 · Posted: 15 Oct 2004 01:36 · Edited by: Jyrki21
I always thought that a Lotus was a kind of dragon; it took me a while to realise that there were no dragons and not really much explicitly blue things, and that that was just the name of the opium den. I also didn't know what opium was, though I had the sense that it was illegal.

Heh... I too learned of the existence of opium through first The Crab with the Golden Claws and then The Blue Lotus and Cigars of the Pharaoh in that order. (Good old Hergé, taught me what the street couldn't!) And likewise, I hadn't a clue what it actually was or what it looked like.

That's one of those elements which dates the earlier part of the series, I suppose... opium trafficking was a serious international problem in the 1930s, even if it barely registers on the radar anymore. Of course, it was just a month and a bit ago that a motorcycle driver in Vietnam offered me some, so I suppose it's still around!

(And yes, immediately after the offer -- which we turned down, thank you very much -- I turned to my travelling companions and said, "Opium? What is this, the 1920s?")
theone
Member
#20 · Posted: 15 Oct 2004 03:51
I knew what Opium was but was surprised to see it in the first Tintin book I read - Blue Lotus. I always ahd thought of Tintin as just a cartoon but after reading the Opium bit I was a bit startled at first - and then read more books and found out Herge included many references to things like that.

The Red Sea sharks is directly mentioned in the book. Although there are no actual sharks, at one point someone calls the "badguys" I think, sharks, or maybe the other way around. But they do call them sharks and that's where the name comes from.

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