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Red Sea Sharks: Skut's nationality?

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Jyrki21
Member
#11 · Posted: 9 Jun 2005 22:47
edcharlesadams: A forgiveable mistake, since Estonia didn't regain any of its independence from the Soviet Union until 1988. I certainly hadn't heard of it before then; mind you I was only six at the time!
Unless you're in your 70s, in which case you should be bordering on remembering it from its pre-war days. :)

LL-C and MT take the unusual step of spelling it "Esthonia," notice. Has anyone else ever seen it written this way?
yamilah
Member
#12 · Posted: 9 Jun 2005 22:52 · Edited by: yamilah
Jyrki21
Esthonia
In the original version, Szut introduces himself as 'Moi esthonien', an ancient rendering...
'Esthonie' is found in older atlases...
Moderator Note: According to some sources Esthonia was a common alternate spelling prior to independence; so not that ancient, perhaps…

The Etymological Tintinologist Team
Jyrki21
Member
#13 · Posted: 10 Jun 2005 01:56
Hah! Haddock calls him an "espèce de Bibendum" in the French version of that frame... (Bibendum is the so-called "Michelin Man," the inflated white mummy-like mascot). A reference to the inflatable lifejacket, obviously, but still quite amusing...
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#14 · Posted: 10 Jun 2005 09:06
LLC and MT take the unusual step of spelling it "Esthonia," notice. Has anyone else ever seen it written this way?

I always took this to show Skut's heavy accent more than anything else, but it may well be an alternative spelling.

Ed
Danagasta
Member
#15 · Posted: 22 Jun 2005 05:46 · Edited by: Moderator
Siyo nigadawu! After giving it a lot of thought, I noticed that all Herge wanted was to have something that rhymed with "Zut!"--kinda like the "Darnitall!" of French. He took a "Russian-sounding" name--Szut in the original--and applied it.

But here's the weird thing. Skut is a real last name, and a Polish one at that. There are actually people named Piotr Skut out there. Creepy.
Courtney
edcharlesadams: I always took this to show Skut's heavy accent more than anything else, but it may well be an alternative spelling.

True, in either the French or English versions, you'll notice that Skut's way of speaking is designed to show that his proficiency in either language isn't really so good. Some people would call this type of speech "broken," but that's just not a good way to describe it. He's obviously a guy working on learning a world language of importance, and I think it's a sign of his "never-give-up" attitude,like when he fought almost to the death to save his new friends.
knos
Member
#16 · Posted: 12 Jul 2005 19:54 · Edited by: Moderator
Pretty bad by the danish translator to miss the phrase that Szut is estonian, they have that one in the swedish albums.

--
Off-topic:
1) What is an Estonian pilot doing there anyway?
2) More off topic: I've heard that estonian is a really "pain in the ass" -language to study. I think they have about 20 cases.

Moderator note:
1) Herge put him there.
2) 14 cases.
Naughty knos, do not veer off topic! Please do start a new thread for each unrelated topic.
Danagasta
Member
#17 · Posted: 13 Jul 2005 15:40 · Edited by: Moderator
Either way, since Skut was Estonian, and given the time-period he was supposed to be from, I'd say he spoke both Estonian and standard Russian. If he was "truly" Estonian,and not just a resident of Russian descent, he'd have clung to that language more so I would think.
Courtney

[Moderator note: stick to the topic, please.
Moderator action: removed irrelevant comments.]
Danagasta
Member
#18 · Posted: 20 Jul 2005 03:38
Siyo nigadawu!!

While trawling and browsing through the Web, I seem to have landed on a gem of an article about Jacques Baruch, also known as Sulev Kaja. He was a Belgian journalist who worked in multiple languages, and was good friends with Hergé. Some say that he's part of the inspiration for Skut. But that leaves one mystery left---who, exactly, did Hergé pattern the appearance after?
Here's the link for the article in the English version.

If anyone knows any more, just drop a line! Thanks!

Courtney (who's working on becoming a Skut Expert™)
tauno
Member
#19 · Posted: 12 Feb 2008 22:43
I´m not sure if it has been posted already, but here is an interesting article, which partly explains why Herge set Piotr Szut as an Estonian character in the two albums.

http://www.einst.ee/literary/spring2003/16_01.htm

The first two albums in Estonian (Cigars and Lotus) will be published around May or June and hopefully the translations will continue. The Estonian translation for Piotr Szut will probably be Peeter Pähk (because "pähh" is something like "szut" in french). Names Sutt and Sütt are also somewhat common in Estonia, but they do not have the meaning necessary for the conversation with cpt Haddock.
tuhatkauno
Member
#20 · Posted: 14 Feb 2008 09:59 · Edited by: tuhatkauno
tauno

The Estonian translation for Piotr Szut will probably be Peeter Pähk (because "pähh" is something like "szut" in french)

Hi my southern fellow

Would the Finnish version "Pjotr Pahk" have an influence on your "Peeter Pähk"?

BTW "tauno" is a very cool name, congratulation :)

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