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New Book by Benoît Peeters about Hergé & His Studios

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yamilah
Member
#1 · Posted: 27 Mar 2006 17:36
Please see the announcement for Nous est un autre by Benoît Peeters at objectiftintin.com.

What do you think about Langlois' commentary?
Danagasta
Member
#2 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 11:31 · Edited by: Danagasta
To be honest, I had always considered E.P. Jacobs to be a bit better of an artist than Herge, but Herge was a better storyteller. And not for nothing, but what would Explorers on the Moon have been without Bob de Moor? I can say the backgrounds wouldn't have been half as gorgeous--the Moonscape wouldn't have been what we know it as today in those books!

I think Langlois is right. Someone should have written a history like this.
Courtney
yamilah
Member
#3 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 18:59
What baffles me is how come Tintin's adventures could be made by so many, and Tintin still confessed to be most personal?

Most relevant to Herge were maybe just his characters?

P.S.: Is there any plain English rendering for 'navrance'?
for its French meaning see http://www.patrimoine-de-france.org/mots/mots-acade-63-31291.html
SingingGandalf
Member
#4 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 20:22
I have thought that before. Herge didn't want anyone else to draw the characters, but he himself allowed lots of others to do backgrounds, and even stories (e.g. Greg for thermozero, lake of sharks)and blue oranges etc.
yamilah
Member
#5 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 22:14 · Edited by: yamilah
To put it differently i.e. letter-wise, about Herge's 'personal characters':

Do you think Tibet, Herge's most eminently personal book (see 'Le Monde d'Herge', p.110, 1990) has undergone a re-lettering* because of ridiculous anachronistic problems that prevent the printing of a facsimile, or for another reason?
Richard
UK Correspondent
#6 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 22:32
yamilah
Do you think Tibet, Herge's most eminently personal book (see 'Le Monde d'Herge', p.110, 1990) has undergone a re-lettering* because of ridiculous anachronistic problems that prevent the printing of a facsimile, or for another reason?

The lettering has been digitalised just like it has been for most foreign language editions. It's easier to print the books using a series of lettering files than entirely different plates. Tibet was presumably chosen since Egmont anticipated selling out of that title first following the Barbican's production last Christmas.

This is an interesting topic, though, the role the Studios played in the books. The comparison can be drawn between this and the Old Masters; although a number of other artists worked on some of the paintings, the overseeing artist signed the work and it's generally attributed to him.

I think it's fair to say that although the Studios drew a lot of the details, Hergé could have done it, but this arrangement left him able to concentrate on other aspects like storyline and the abstract art that became increasingly important toward the end of his life.
tybaltstone
Member
#7 · Posted: 28 Mar 2006 23:09
One of Hergé's rare gifts was a single vision, and that is often overlooked in favour of the surface of comics - artwork, or even story. Edgar Jacobs was possibly more technically proficient but his stories don't hold together as well as Hergé's, and are often a little cumbersome (and I say that as a very big Jacobs fan). Hergé also had a little more soul in his work. Tintin may be the sum of many parts, but it did take one person to be able to bring it all together. While other contributors each held different ingredients, only Hergé had the recipe!
Danagasta
Member
#8 · Posted: 29 Mar 2006 00:18
P.S.: Is there any plain English rendering for 'navrance'?
The closest I can come to that is "annoyance" without the sentence it was used in. That darned context again :)

As for the idea of Hergé claiming that something was personal but worked on by so many, that's beyond my scope of reference. When you assign people to help you, they take an equal part of the responsibility and the credit. Anything else is, to me, very wrong. It doesn't respect the talents of others, sadly.

Courtney
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#9 · Posted: 29 Mar 2006 08:47
yamilah What baffles me is how come Tintin's adventures could be made by so many, and Tintin still confessed to be most personal?

I suppose it depends on how you interpret ‘personal‘. I think Hergé meant Tintin was personal because it concerned, and affected, his private life and personality.

Danagasta When you assign people to help you, they take an equal part of the responsibility and the credit.

I don't agree with this. Does this mean the string quartet on The Beatles ‘Yesterday’ should take an equal part of the credit for the song? You could say that Hergé's assistants were like session musicians with Hergé writing the songs and the other artists backing him up (Oh, I'll find any excuse to use a Beatles analogy!)

The Tintin books were written entirely by Hergé and every frame and angle conceived by him. Just because he didn't ink every blade of grass himself doesn't necessarily mean the work was any less personal to him.
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#10 · Posted: 29 Mar 2006 10:47
I see it this way: Hergé didn't take on an artistic collaborator on the Tintin series until around 1942-3, when the books first started to be put into colour. Even then, all the drawings were Hergé's own. Edgar Pierre Jacobs and (to a lesser extent) Jacques van Melkebeke began working with Hergé on the Tintin stories in 1944, starting with The Seven Crystal Balls. By this time, virtually all the basic elements of Tintin's universe were in place: from the main characters (Tintin, Snowy, the Thompsons, Haddock, Calculus) whose personalities were largely established, to the settings and essential style of the books. So in essence everything you see in a post-war book is according to Hergé's already well-established vision and style. In his work with the Studios, he still remained captain of the ship, as it were. Tellingly, the inability of Jacobs and van Melekebeke to accept this led to their partnership with Hergé eventually ending.

Does this mean the string quartet on The Beatles ‘Yesterday’ should take an equal part of the credit for the song?

Good call Chris! For that matter, should Lennon even receive a credit, and should his estate receive royalties? But that's a different point entirely! ;-)

Ed

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