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Using Tintin: How do I get permissions?

Ivan the Dictator
Member
#1 · Posted: 27 Dec 2016 15:13 · Edited by: Moderator
Hi. I am Ivan Yevgenyevich Milenin, aka, Ivan the Dictator. I was born on January 31, 2000 in Russia, but living in the United States.

I came here to adapt a series of The Adventures of Tintin, but, I may expect that if I don't have permission to do so, I will be in critical trouble regarding with the law.

I understand that these copyrights belong to Hergé/ Moulinsart, and somehow explicitly reserved to the exclusive rights to Hergé and the other publishers, and I respect that.

I don't know of this discussion can be credited as fan fiction work, but I am not intended here to steal and make money, should anything be related as copyright infringement.

But what I came here for is how to receive permission on using the series of Tintin, and making and posting it to YouTube, as an own version of Tintin, but if that's considered fan work, which is not allowed by the order of Moulinsart, then please allow my to share my apologies.

But what is confusing is... Does a self worker has to do work that is strictly entirely by it's own?
I know the reason for the answer, but how come?

Even if so, how did Spielberg have rights to use an adaptation of Tintin?
I know why, but, does it have to do with the rights being sold? Is that the case?
(Take for example of Spider-Man and Batman, and Superman. These franchises made various adaptations, because I learned that that the owner sold the rights to various TV and movie directors and producers.)

So, if you can, I will receive the response, whether this discussion is not valid and be able to close this thread, or maybe there could be an opportunity, excluding illegal books, such is, Tintin in Thailand, or Breaking Free, or for how Tintin got a job by Yves Rodier.

But let me know if getting permission to use the rights of Tintin from the respectful works of Hergé of deciding what books to use when some of them are acceptable or not acceptable. I won't deny you, but let me know as soon as you can.

Thanks.

Warm regards,

Ivan.
jock123
Moderator
#2 · Posted: 2 Jan 2017 14:14
Ivan the Dictator:
I came here to adapt a series of The Adventures of Tintin, but, I may expect that if I don't have permission to do so, I will be in critical trouble regarding with the law.

If you make an adaptation for your own private use, not to be shared with other people, you can do what you like. If you decide to make them available (so publish them in print, or put them on the web) then, yes, you will undoubtedly have problems with the law if you don't seek and get permission for your project first.

Ivan the Dictator:
I am not intended here to steal and make money, should anything be related as copyright infringement.

Making money has little or nothing to do with the issue, although it might have a bearing later on in a legal case: the need to get permission first still is the important thing to keep in mind.

Ivan the Dictator:
what I came here for is how to receive permission on using the series of Tintin, and making and posting it to YouTube, as an own version of Tintin,

You could approach Moulinsart and ask them for permission, but it is almost certainly going to meet with a reply of "no".
Doing it without asking permission, is, again, putting yourself on the wrong side of copyright.

Ivan the Dictator:
But what is confusing is... Does a self worker has to do work that is strictly entirely by it's own?

I'm afraid I don't understand your point here, but hope it is covered by the information above and elsewhere on the site.

Ivan the Dictator:
how did Spielberg have rights to use an adaptation of Tintin?

He asked Hergé, before he died. Unfortunately they never met, but Hergé had already suggested that Spielberg was his choice to make a Tintin film. Beyond that, Spielberg and his producers came to a legal deal, with a contract about how and what they could use and do, and paid for the privilege.

Ivan the Dictator:
These franchises made various adaptations, because I learned that that the owner sold the rights to various TV and movie directors and producers.

Yes, that is basically the way it works.

Ivan the Dictator:
let me know if getting permission to use the rights of Tintin from the respectful works of Hergé of deciding what books to use when some of them are acceptable or not acceptable.

Again I'm not 100% sure of what you are asking here, but you have to bear in mind that if it is creating completely new adventures is what you have in mind, you will be unlikely to get past the fact that Hergé asked that there be no new stories after his death, and his widow has maintained that position as her general policy.

But here the discussion has to stop, as all we can do is speculate: only you can decide what to do next - but if you want to produce your Tintin stories and make them available legally, you will have to approach Moulinsart first.
pwangdu
Member
#3 · Posted: 9 Oct 2017 14:18 · Edited by: Moderator
@Ivan the dictator,I guess you will have to approach Éditions Casterman, Belgium for permission. Moulinsart no longer holds (since 1942) the copyright to Tintin publications, the character Tintin and all characters.

Moderator Note: We realise that you are new and enthusiastic, but would ask that you try and avoid flooding your replies with the same information, especially when your information is fundamentally wrong.

The right to publish Tintin is held by Casterman, but the copyright in the characters and stories themselves are most definitely held by Moulinsart.
You have arrived at your mistaken conclusion no doubt from the recent court case regarding which entity (Casterman or Moulinsart) should grant permission for the use of images extracted from the books, which the court decided should be covered under the contract entered into between Hergé and Casterman in 1942, at the time the books were to start being reworked in colour (in spite of the the fact that this was not the interpretation or intention of either of the parties).
This did not transfer ownership of the characters, nor did it amount to Hergé selling the rights.

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