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Do Hergé's characters live on in unauthorized books?

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gnolles
Member
#1 · Posted: 27 Jan 2005 12:12
The dialogue in "books" about Müller's nationality brings this reflection to me:
- What is actually true about Hergé's characters? Do apocryph stories (Zinzin, Bud Weiser's, Tintin in Nicaragua, the Pustaha etc.) tell us about the real life of Tintin, Snowy, Haddock and their friends and enemies?
I personally believe that what happens to Tintin and Calculus in the Pustha is completely true, because it was imagined by the author (van Leffe) Hergé characters continue to live in apocryphal stories.
Do you fellow members agree or disagree with me?
jock123
Moderator
#2 · Posted: 27 Jan 2005 12:44
Interesting question, gnolles!

Personally I don’t think I have ever seen anything in a pirate edition which really convinced me that it was “true”, with the possible exception of Tintin - Freelance Reporter (Reporter Pigiste au XXe Siecle) by Yves Rodier; it is based on a scenario he found elsewhere, in an old “Spirou” magazine, and it rings true to me... The art is nice, the characters are agreeable, and the incident seems in the spirit of Hergé. Setting it before Soviets takes advanage of the fact that it doesn’t contradict anything, and it fills in a hole nicely; plus it is short, so it doesn’t out-stay its welcome and keeps the quality high.

I don’t know who the Pustha author “Van Leffe” is - why does that stand out for you?
Richard
UK Correspondent
#3 · Posted: 27 Jan 2005 20:08
I personally would take the line that the only events that are "true" are the ones in Hergé's books. As Tintin's creator, artist and author, anything that Hergé says goes - whatever he did to his creation, such as changing his personality in "Picaros", was "right", since it's what his author intended. As Hergé's intellectual property, I would say that he was the only one who could give Tintin a history.

That said, other parodies, pastiches, tributes etc. are interesting to read as they are interpretations of Hergé's world, but as they're not part of the canon, then I prefer to think of them as containing "fictional" events.
gnolles
Member
#4 · Posted: 28 Jan 2005 14:46
Of course!.
Nevertheless, in an interwiew published recently in Moskowskie Novosti, Vassili Axionov says about his book "Volteriantsy i Volterianki" (which imagines the meeting of Voltaire and Kathrine II): "I thouhgt it would be interesting to write something like true stories that never happened"
I think apocryph Tintin stories belong to this kind of fiction.
And sometimes fiction explains history an psychology better than true...
snafu
Member
#5 · Posted: 29 Mar 2005 16:24 · Edited by: Moderator
Yes, and no...

Tintin is often heavily used because of his appeal to all kinds of people. Tintin attracts attention, so many people will use him, often in crude ways so that Tintin is not himself. Can you imagine Tintin flipping a switch that releases a nuclear warhead ("Tintin in Lebanon"), going into sex bars ("Tintin in Thailand"), or engaging in heavily political conflicts ("Breaking Free")? I think not. Whoever is appearing in those stories is certainly not Tintin and/or his friends...

In conclusion, one could argue that Herge's characters live on in unauthorized versions of Tintin books, but those people are definitely NOT the way the master imagined them. In a sense the original characters are only (and very faithfully) preserved by Tintinologists.

I might be taking things in a too hard-line manner though (I only like Tintin material that truly contains true spirit of the Adventures), so take my points with a grain of salt...

--
EDIT:
I was actually more inclined towards saying "no". Tintin in any form that does not really resemble Tintin in the true books is NOT him.

--
[Post edited by Moderator (marsbar). Combined two posts.]
jockosjungle
Member
#6 · Posted: 29 Mar 2005 19:00
Well I'll add myself to this debate and say definitely not.

I'm yet to read an Unauthorised Tintin adventure that lives up to the high standard that Herge himself set for Tintin. I've read some ones that were quite good and would have been enjoyable if original characters had been used but by associating themselves with Tintin they automatically prove the point that Herge was a true genius and nobody could really continue his work.

Tintin does live on in many ways and Unauthorised Fan Fiction does not need to be an outlet.

For me Herge's work lives on in the research I do for my website and the information others provide via books and the net. I would much rather look forward to seeing a new article on this site than searching for a copy of Tintin in Thailand.

I visit this site daily and post new topics and reply to others based on something someone has read or that I've noticed in one of the books that leads to lively debate.

For me that is how Tintin lives on

Rik
jock123
Moderator
#7 · Posted: 30 Mar 2005 08:42
snafu
Tintin in any form that does not really resemble Tintin in the true books is NOT him.
Yes, but what about the many books in which the author is trying to write in the spirit of Hergé - Rodier, Harry Edwood etc.? Your answer implies that books which do resemble Hergé’s are authentic…
snafu
Member
#8 · Posted: 30 Mar 2005 20:10
Good catch! I was primarily dealing with pirate Tintin books, which are out to attack Tintin and others. I really don't know about authorized works on Tintin not made by Herge.

It would be interested to see how the ultimate authorities of Tintin answer this question...
Tournesol
Member
#9 · Posted: 10 May 2005 23:41
I fully agree with jockosjungle here: I haven't seen ANY parodies or homages living up to Hergé's standard or even the feel of the Tintin adventures.

It is rather strange: 99% of all unauthorised Tintin comics are based around sex and ultra violence. Themes completely missing from Hergé's work.

If you're supposed to do an homage, and if you call yourself talented, why not try doing something good that exposes that talent?
jock123
Moderator
#10 · Posted: 11 May 2005 14:09
Tournesol
It is rather strange: 99% of all unauthorised Tintin comics are based around sex and ultra violence. Themes completely missing from Hergé's work.

Well your statistic will have to ride, as I can see no way of proving or disproving it one way or another - personally I think you have over-emphasised it, as there are plenty of attempts at “Hergian” stories too.

As to the second point, I think it explains your first: people will write the sex‘n‘violence stuff - or just stuff which generally lampoons Tintin’s somewhat prissy image - because it has a comedic/ satiric potential, and that’s what the authors are looking to achieve (I’m not saying they do, mind you).

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