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Why ban Tintin fan fiction?

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Danagasta
Member
#31 · Posted: 12 Jul 2005 14:27
Admin: Where the concept is recognized, fair use/dealing allows a small amount of copyrighted work to be used for research, teaching, commentary, news reporting, parody--but not fan fiction/art creation.

That was my main concern. Fair use is definitely a big issue for me. I was worried that they didn't even allow THAT.
Courtney
SmartTintin
Member
#32 · Posted: 18 Aug 2007 12:51
Harrock n Roll:

That's fine!!! I never knew that Moulinsart had copyrights over everything including the phrase "Blistering barnacles".

I apologize for starting such a thread unaware!

Thanks for notification!
IvanIvanovitch
Member
#33 · Posted: 12 Jun 2008 05:04
tybaltstone wrote:
I draw my own comic strip, and I would feel very odd - I wouldn't like it - if someone else took my characters and made their own stories with them (highly likely, I know).

The question here put has hung heavily on my mind ever since I found out about the ban. In this light, though, I begin to understand.
I draw constantly. I, too, have characters that I have conceived and tended and cared about. When I think of someone else drawing one of them, it's simply unpleasant. It's like someone acting as parent to one of your children (pardon cliche') and it is an insult.
I love to draw Tintin. But seen from Herge's view, I can agree that I should keep my drawings and writings to myself (and perhaps a few close friends).
tintinagalog
Member
#34 · Posted: 14 Jun 2008 05:05 · Edited by: tintinagalog
I don't think that Mounlinsart could be able to control fan fictions and fan arts after showing Spielberg's Tintin, especially when our hero gross up millions of dollars like Indiana Jones and gather millions of admirers. Hmm... let's wait and see. And if that happens,...
Tintinrulz
Member
#35 · Posted: 14 Jun 2008 11:40 · Edited by: Tintinrulz
I totally I agree. As long as the fan fiction and fan art aren't made for profit, I don't see a problem with it. Moulinsart are far to much like dictators. I'm sure Herge wanted people to respect his work but he would have been happy with people doing their own works based on his creations.
Herge wouldn't have been happy with some of the merchandising Moulinsart do.
Disrespect indeed. It works both ways - they need to respect his wishes too.
jock123
Moderator
#36 · Posted: 14 Jun 2008 12:46
Tintinrulz wrote:
As long as the fan fiction and fan art aren't made for profit, I don't see a problem with it. Moulinsart are far to much like dictators.

I feel like a broken record here, but Moulinsart are legally obliged to do what they do: they are contracted to protect the copyright - it’s what they are there for.
For all intents and purposes they are like security guards or policemen; if you paid a security guard to stop people bopping you on the nose, and the security guard let someone bop you on the nose, you wouldn’t expect them to go “Well, they didn’t do it for profit, you see, so I thought to myself ‘Why not?’, and I stood back, like, and they bopped you on the nose…”, would you? If they let two or three people do it, then the flood-gates would open, and pretty soon you’d have a black eye and a cauliflower ear, and nobody would know whether people were bopping you for profit or pleasure.

Tintinrulz wrote:
Herge wouldn't have been happy with some of the merchandising Moulinsart do.

There is absolutely no basis for you to make that statement on, I’m afraid, it’s pure speculation. I’d say that Mme Hergée bis is a far better judge of that than you, and if she believes she is respecting his wishes, it isn’t for us to say otherwise.
Mr Blumenstein
Member
#37 · Posted: 5 Aug 2008 16:03
I can understand banning Tintin fan-fiction if its goingto be like the horrific Tintin in Thailand which is more of a pornographic book than a tribute to Herges masterpiece.
IvanIvanovitch
Member
#38 · Posted: 7 Aug 2008 17:10
Is there any enforcement on the part of Moulinsart to protect this particular copyright? I mean, I don't want men in black suits knocking on my door.

Squirming here...
geoffdow
Member
#39 · Posted: 1 Sep 2008 05:04
jock123:
I still think that Stephen King has a very good model for protecting his copyright: if you want to make a student/ non-profit/ amateur film of one of his stories, he will license you to do it for $1US, and a copy of your movie when it is done. He does not relinquish his rights over the story or characters as such, he just grants permission reasonably freely.

Hi, newbie here. I don't write fan-fiction and have little interest in it, but at the same time I have a lot of problems with copyright laws as they currently exist - I think they are designed far more to protect corporations than artists and that the internet is likely to make them de facto irrelevant sooner than later in any case.

Ahem. But I digress.

I'm fascinated by what you said King is doing? Any chance of a citation on that?

Thanks in advance.
jock123
Moderator
#40 · Posted: 1 Sep 2008 22:20 · Edited by: jock123
geoffdow:
I have a lot of problems with copyright laws as they currently exist - I think they are designed far more to protect corporations than artists

Interesting, but why? As has been pointed out here and elsewhere, copyright actually offers exactly the same protection to the holder be they a multi-national or you sitting at home in your kitchen working on the table. You can't be ripped off by Moulinsart (just for an example) taking your "The Adventures of Geoff Dow" and publishing it without your say so, and you can't run off your own Tintin stories... Seems equitable to me.
As for the internet making them irrelevant, well that will be bad news for all the small press, independent creators - some of whom post here - who have so much invested in being able to own and develop properties (have you checked out Garen's The Rainbow Orchid or Les's Jonny Crossbones? Both protected by copyright...)

As for Stephen King's "Dollar Babies", I think I read about it first in the introduction to Frank Darabont's screenplay to The Shawshank Redemption or The Green Mile - he made a version of the short story The Woman in the Room, which Mr. King thought was possibly the best of the amateur films of his work. You can find mentions of it on the net by Googling for "dollar baby" or the like...

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