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Why ban Tintin fan fiction?

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geoffdow
Member
#41 · Posted: 1 Sep 2008 23:12
jock123:
Interesting, but why? As has been pointed out here and elsewhere, copyright actually offers exactly the same protection to the holder be they a multi-national or you sitting at home in your kitchen working on the table.

That's a huge issue; I'm really tempted to pretend you didn't ask me. But I guess you did ...

The first is simply the reality of the net; music and video downloading is the obvious example. No matter what the law is, people are going to keep stealing it. Copyright owners can either fight what I think is a losing battle, or they can adapt. Musicians, at least, have the option of going on the road and playing concerts - film-makers? Or writers and cartoonists? I'm not sure what the answer is. Some, such as my fellow-Canadian writer Peter Watts (http://www.rifters.com) have, at least temporarily, just given up. Even those novels of his that are in print are also available for download on his own website, with the option to "pay" him via PayPal should a reader choose to do so.

Will that be a successful economic model? No one knows yet, but if people are going to steal no matter what the law says, something else needs to be tried.

Legalities and technical issues aside, I believe your argument, that copyright protects me as much as it does Moulinsart is hollow, if not quite bogus.

Neither Hergé nor Moulinsart are damaged by, say, Rodier's version of Alph-Art. As it turns out, Rodier is good artist but no Hergé, and even if he had fully succeeded, who would have been harmed? People are still going to want to read the original.

Essentially, I think the world of art and culture is diminished by stringent copyright laws. A famous example is Shakespeare, who stole all but two of his plots from earlier works. The idea that art - concepts and characters - are private property, are a commodity, is a fairly new one and I don't think a healthy one.

Protection during the artist's life? Yes, probably, at least for the actual work (as opposed to merely playing with characters). But protection for, say, Warner Brothers, so that they can keep making money off of Batman in perpetuity (if they can get American laws revised once again)?

I don't see any reason for that beyond the almighty dollar.

Hergé has been dead for a quarter-century now; copyright doesn't protect him in any way, shape or form - and arguably, it hurts the world by taking Tintin out of the recombinant discourse that until very recently always had been - and should be again - the world of art, where artists borrow and steal from each other in the never-ending creative process.

P.S. Thanks muchly for links and the hints about King.
number1fan
Member
#42 · Posted: 12 Nov 2010 11:27 · Edited by: number1fan
Why ban fan fiction indeed when Spielberg will change a lot of the stories by introducing a rival American reporter.
jock123
Moderator
#43 · Posted: 12 Nov 2010 20:16
number1fan:
Why ban fan fiction indeed when Spielberg will change a lot of the stories by introducing a rival American reporter.

This is just digging up an old topic and re-hashing what has been said many times in this and other threads on these forums: because it can be controlled, and rights given.

Whatever happens, you won’t have the rival reporter and Tintin drinking whisky in a bar and smoking, or chasing women in discos. Fan fiction is done without that permission, so the writers feel they can do what they want…
number1fan
Member
#44 · Posted: 12 Nov 2010 20:27
jock123:
Whatever happens, you won’t have the rival reporter and Tintin drinking whisky in a bar and smoking, or chasing women in discos.

Lets wait for the film you never know.
But its a shame Moulinsart never have a competition to see who can do the best fan work.I fill that they wont even diminish Herge's books.I always felt Lake of Sharks was a bit of a fan work.
jock123
Moderator
#45 · Posted: 12 Nov 2010 22:21 · Edited by: jock123
number1fan:
Lets wait for the film you never know.

I may not know, but I am totally certain!
number1fan:
I always felt Lake of Sharks was a bit of a fan work.

But that's the point - it wasn't: it was authorized, and produced officially, with permission, by people known and trusted by Hergé.
number1fan
Member
#46 · Posted: 14 Nov 2010 23:04
But it fills like a fan work even though it was commissioned.Once the film comes out the fan fictions will get very big out there so lets just wait and see.
Grey
Member
#47 · Posted: 15 Nov 2010 17:48
Fanwork is bound to go up incredibly and it is certain that sites will be full of Tintin fanfiction and fanart. Currently there isn't much on the internet as there have been no released trailers or posters (Too early for that advertising) to reel in the fans. It's also more than likely the fanwork will be written by 'newbies', who tend to ignore the original texts and go along their own way in fandom.

It doesn't help that Jamie Bell is portraying Tintin, who is certainly a female favourite among the community and Andy Serkis is the Captain, who is currently automatically loved for his previous work in LOTR and King Kong. Of course you have Simon Pegg and Nick Frost as the Thompson Twins, who are synonymous with British fans as well as Tintin.

I believe the words 'duck and cover' are going to be used when the success of the film creates the legion of fangirls.
Jelsemium
Member
#48 · Posted: 10 Oct 2011 17:42
Much as I love fan fiction, I have to admit that it's on shaky ground. Different companies have different reactions. Disney doesn't worry about fiction. However, (in spite of what an earlier poster said) it DOES worry about fan art. Disney art is really their bread and butter, so they protect fiercely.

However, they can't be as protective of their characters because they use so many that are in the public domain (Snow White, Cinderella, Aladdin, even Pocahontas, to name a few.) They also use other people's creations (Bambi, Pinocchio, The Little Mermaid).

However, just because one company or writer tolerates fan fiction doesn't mean that all are obliged to. You can't say "Well, stores should expect shoplifters, therefore it's all right for me to shoplift." Nor can you say, "Well, some stores give free samples, therefore ALL stores are obliged to give out free samples."

You have to go on a case by case basis. Since Herge and Moulinsart have made their anti-fan fiction sentiments abundantly clear, a REAL fan would respect their wishes.
OptimisticTimelord26
Member
#49 · Posted: 14 Sep 2016 23:04 · Edited by: Moderator
What do you think about the fan stories about Tintin out there? I've noticed on [Deleted by Moderator] that there are a lot of stories about Tintin. [Deleted by Moderator]

I think that a lot of the fan art and stories are only done for fun or in tribute to the comics. However, it is not okay to just use the character to make money.

Moderator Warning: We appreciate the fact that you are a recent arrival, and are merely showing enthusiasm, but under no circumstances can you post in formation about where or how to find unauthorized material. When you signed up for membership you agreed to abide by the forum rules and this is one of the biggest and most important of the few rules we do have.
Remaining entirely above board and legal is both the moral and right thing to do, and ensures that we can continue to operate, making the site and forums available to all.
You will also find that we have had many threads and discussions which have touched on fan-fiction, including this one, to which your post has been moved. You will find a list of related threads here.
Please do not post links to any site which promotes the circulation of fan-fiction.
The Tintinologist Team
iluvtintin
Member
#50 · Posted: 2 Oct 2016 06:29 · Edited by: Moderator
Should Tintin fan fiction be banned? My answer is no.
I read a lot of really good fan fiction of Tintin and I even write fan fiction myself for him.
I mean it shouldn't hurt. All the characters belong to Hergé. They will always belong to Hergé. Fan art and fan fiction is only for fun.
Hergé even loved fan art. He just didn't want people to keep doing Tintin after his death.
I think fan art and fan fiction is fine as long they give credit and don't use it for money.

I agree with OptimisticTimelord26.

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Note from Moderator: combined 2 consecutive posts.

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