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Lucky Luke coming out in English

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SingingGandalf
Member
#1 · Posted: 18 May 2006 15:16
Hi, I've never read a 'Lucky Luke' book before by Morriss and Goskinny, but, while looking on amazon, I saw that they were coming to English in paperback. Has anone read one before, they are not like Tintin, but are one of the key Franco-Belgian comics. The 3 that will be released are:
~Billy the kid
~Arizona
~Rodeo
yweski
Member
#2 · Posted: 18 May 2006 18:22
Besides Tintin, I also read Lucky Luke. The stories are not as complex as Tintin but still entertaining.
Martin
Member
#3 · Posted: 21 Jun 2006 15:50
Arizona and Rodeo are pre-Goscinny and a bit bland (Morris was better at drawing than writing), but Billy the Kid is a good read.

Those titles were all published by Dupuis, whose editorial policies rather stifled the duo and the albums from that period aren't as good as the ones they wrote for Dargaud. If they are releasing the Dargaud albums, keep your eyes peeled for The Tenderfoot, The Stagecoach, Jesse James and Apache Canyon, which are in my view some of the best in the series.

Oh, and steer clear of any of the ones written after the death of Goscinny in 1977 (I remember the day he died -- I was 10 and heartbroken); they're pretty much all dreadful.

Lucky Luke is a fantastic character when he is done right, and the interaction between him and his horse, Jolly Jumper, is worth the price of the books in itself.
shaynedj
Member
#4 · Posted: 13 Jul 2008 06:13 · Edited by: Moderator
Hey guys, I'm a BIG fan of Lucky Luke, even the Terrence Hill movie.
But I love the comics. Haven't been able to buy any here in India (English of course). my old library had a couple, they're pretty old and ratty but the overall condition is not to bad. I want more though, they lost a few. As I recall, there were about 4.

Edited for content.

Moderator Note: Welcome to the forums. It has been necessary to edit you post and remove some of the content, because we can’t allow discussions of how to obtain copyright material illegally, or requests for downloads. Please read the posting guidelines if you need clarification.
However the good news for you is that the books are being published in English again, so they are available through bookshops and on-line retailers; you might be able to get your library to order them too.
The Happy Tintinologist Team
george
Member
#5 · Posted: 19 Dec 2008 11:57
Martin:
If they are releasing the Dargaud albums, keep your eyes peeled for The Tenderfoot, The Stagecoach, Jesse James and Apache Canyon, which are in my view some of the best in the series.

Cinebook have just published The Dashing White Cowboy and in the back there's a listing of the Lucky Luke books for the next year. They are: The Daltons in the Blizzard, The Black Hills, Apache Canyon, The Escort, On the Daltons' Trail, and The Oklahoma Land Rush. I've a feeling that they are sticking to Goscinny books.

Funnily enough they've not yet published The Stagecoach which was almost always put out by previous licensees.

George
george
Member
#6 · Posted: 19 Aug 2010 22:43 · Edited by: george
Martin:
Arizona and Rodeo are pre-Goscinny and a bit bland (Morris was better at drawing than writing), but Billy the Kid is a good read.

I'm somewhat confused but what books Goscinny had a hand in and what he didn't, confusion further fuelled by Cinebook's latest Lucky Luke release 'The Judge'.

Nowhere in the book is Goscinny's name mentioned - indeed the credits explicitly read 'story and drawings by Morris' - and yet wikipedia (I know, I know...) and all other sources have Goscinny credited. The exception appears to be the French album, which inside also grants Morris sole authorship.

Have Cinebook made a mistake? Or has Goscinny been added in the same way he's added to new Asterix books, more as an acknowledgement?

Enquiring minds and all that...

George
Morganson
Member
#7 · Posted: 20 Aug 2010 06:24
I've read some of the English versions of Lucky Luke. A great series that, needless to say, is comparable to Asterix also by Goscinny.
mct16
Member
#8 · Posted: 20 Aug 2010 23:56 · Edited by: mct16
george:
I'm somewhat confused but what books Goscinny had a hand in and what he didn't, confusion further fuelled by Cinebook's latest Lucky Luke release 'The Judge'.

Just to add to the confusion: some sources claim that "En remontant le Mississippi" ("Up le Mississippi") is also a Goscinny-written story but others, including the book itself, show it was all Morris' work.

It would seem that this was a period when Goscinny was only starting to contribute to the series but that this did not stop Morris from coming up with his own stories. It is not impossible that in some cases Goscinny may have made some contribution to the plot and the jokes but not enough for the publishers to give him actual credit. There have been instances when the script of a movie is credited to a pseudonym or another writer while the actual writer of the script is not mentioned due to various factors.

I think that it was not until "A l'ombre des derricks" ("In the Shadow of the Derricks") published in 1962 that Goscinny was officially acknowledged as the scriptwriter in this and all the subsequent albums until his death.
george
Member
#9 · Posted: 22 Aug 2010 16:07 · Edited by: george
mct16:
It is not impossible that in some cases Goscinny may have made some contribution to the plot and the jokes but not enough for the publishers to give him actual credit.

That makes a lot of sense - perhaps he was a contributing gag-man rather than a 'writer' in the traditional sense for these early albums? I base that thought on absolutely no evidence at all mind!

One interesting* piece of evidence is that each page of art has Morris' signature alone, not the more familiar 'Morris & Goscinny'. The upcoming 'Lucky Luke Versus Joss Jamon' is the same, although it seems that Goscinny became '[...] the appointed scenario writer of the adventures of Lucky Luke starting from the 11th album "Lucky Luke against Joss Jamon" (Dupuis, 1958)' so perhaps the signature proves nothing.

Actually, and I'm not sure if this helps at all, the Goscinny web-site links to a PDF that says it is a 'Reproduction of the original synopsis written by Rene Goscinny for the album: On the track of Dalton' (thank you babelfish...). It is 23 pages long which, for a book he receives no published credit on, is pretty good going!

I think I've confused myself now**...

George

(* using the word in its very loosest sense...)


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

** Yes I have. I've just found this piece on the Goscinny site (translated via babelfish):

"The signature of Goscinny appears finally at the side of that of Morris on the covers of Lucky Luke. “The Rivals of Painful Gulch” album n° 19, Dupuis, are the first album on which figure the name of Goscinny. Although Goscinny is the scenario writer of the albums n° 9 then n° 11 and of all the following, the name of Rene Goscinny will not be reproduced for a long time on the covers of albums 9 and 11 to 18."

So, answering my own question, it looks like maybe Cinebook are wrong to credit Morris alone for this album. Phew, back to hibernation for me...
mct16
Member
#10 · Posted: 22 Aug 2010 23:51
george:
Actually, and I'm not sure if this helps at all, the Goscinny web-site links to a PDF that says it is a 'Reproduction of the original synopsis written by Rene Goscinny for the album: On the track of Dalton' (thank you babelfish...). It is 23 pages long which, for a book he receives no published credit on, is pretty good going!

Excellent find, George. When I next go to France I might just buy a copy in order to see how much of the script ended in the final book.

This site lists almost every comic strip ever published in the leading French-language comics and is quite thorough. It lists Goscinny as the writer from "Des rails sur la prairie" ("Rail Tracks on the Prairie") onwards, though it leaves his name out for "Alerte aux pieds bleus" ("Look Out for the Blue Feet"), most sources stating that on this occasion Goscinny was in America so Morris did all the work himself.

Other artists at the time did tend to include the names of their co-authors on the pages of their comics. Franquin (another leading artist of the time) did include the names of Greg or Goscinny whenever they helped him with his work. I suppose that in Morris' case it simply took a while to do likewise and this is what led to the present confusion.

george:
Phew, back to hibernation for me...

I might just join you.

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