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About the comic strip's origin

yamilah
Member
#1 · Posted: 22 Dec 2006 21:46 · Edited by: yamilah
In the 6th paragraph of the article from the 'Knowledge' section of The Times on Saturday December 9th, quoted by Harrock n roll in 'What next for Tintin in 2007' thread (see http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,14933-2487690,00.htm l ), the curator of the Tintin exhibition in Pompidou, Paris, reportedly declared he was "wondering why something born one century ago -the comic strip form- was not in [his] collection".

Please could anyone tell us where was our 'modern' comic strip born?
Richard
UK Correspondent
#2 · Posted: 22 Dec 2006 23:55 · Edited by: Richard
yamilah
Please could anyone tell us where was our 'modern' comic strip born?

It depends what you class as a 'comic strip'. If it's simply a marriage of words and pictures, then you can trace it back as far as Leonardo's sketchbooks of the 15th century, and was refined in William Hogarth's Rake's Progress from the 1730s. There's early word-and-picture stories such as Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz and Richard Outcault's Yellow Kid but I'd say the first comic strip proper is Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland, an American strip begun in 1905.

At this time, though, Europe was lagging behind. Binchon's Becassine (who, as we know, the early Tintin bears a striking resemblance to!) still carried captions underneath the drawings. It was the Frenchman Alain Saint-Ogan's Zig et Puce that introduced the comic strip with speech bubbles to the continent in 1925, and as we know, Hergé's Tintin followed in 1929.

So the 'modern' comic strip is roughly a hundred years old, but its roots stretch much further back in time. Europe took a while to catch up- the end of the Second World War, to be precise, when American creativity reached an all-time low and Belgium overtook thanks to Hergé's continuing work, and that of E.P. Jacobs, Franquin and the like.
tybaltstone
Member
#3 · Posted: 23 Dec 2006 11:20
Can I recommend the site of a very good chap I know, Andy, with lots of lovely comic-strip history goodness...

http://bugpowder.com/andy/index.html

I know this is going back further than the modern strip cartoon, but I'm sure will be of interest.

Best -
Garen
yamilah
Member
#4 · Posted: 23 Dec 2006 15:19 · Edited by: yamilah
Richard
was refined in William Hogarth's Rake's Progress from the 1730s.
I saw those engravings on the excellent site tybaltstone gave above: the characters are many and don't seem as recognizable or legible as those from the later comics you mentioned, who were also always given names, as it seems.

At this time, though, Europe was lagging behind.
Maybe the difference between 'captions' and 'speech bubbles' is not so relevant?

There's early word-and-picture stories such as Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz and Richard Outcault's Yellow Kid but I'd say the first comic strip proper is Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland, an American strip begun in 1905.
Do you think the European and American comics could have a common origin?

tybaltstone
Thanks for this excellent link!
yamilah
Member
#5 · Posted: 31 Dec 2006 20:46 · Edited by: yamilah
Here's an interesting site with short articles about the issue:
http://www.toonopedia.com/yellow.htm (Yellow Kid, USA, 1895)
http://www.toonopedia.com/nemo.htm (Little Nemo, USA, 1905)

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