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Hergé named in Blake & Mortimer

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Balthazar
Moderator
#11 · Posted: 4 Feb 2007 10:32
According to Harry Thompson's biography of Hergé, the bust up with Jacobs came when Hergé was working on Prisoners of the Sun for the newly founded Tintin Magazine, shortly after the war. (Thompson doesn't specify the precise date of the bust-up, but I think he's meaning around late 1946 or early 1947.) Basically, it seems that Jacobs felt he was doing so much work on Tintin - helping with plot development and writing, as well as colouring and background details - that he was basically an equal creative partner and should have joint authorial credit for the Tintin adventures they were producing together. Hergé refused, and the pair - who (according to Thompson) had been working closely as partners since the end of 1943 - felt out.

However, Harry Thompson goes on to say that they patched it up later and became friends again, and that Jacobs worked for Hergé on Tintin again - but only on a cash basis, ie: not as equal partners. So presumeably, this is the basis on which Jacobs was working for Hergé when he was helping to redraw and colour Cigars in the mid-fifties.

In this light, I can't help wondering whether Jacobs' apppearance on the Cigars cover was a little more than just a friendly tribute to Jacobs. Maybe it was also a slightly cheeky ironic joke by Herge: ie: "Here you go, Edgar; you always wanted your name on the Tintin book covers, so finally I've put it on one - beneath a picture of you as a mummified corpse!"

That's just my own guess though (not backed up by anything Thompson or any other researcher has said), so I could be reading too much into it! In any case, there's no reason to think Jacobs didn't find his jokey portrayal as a dead Egyptologist both amusing and pleasing. He was, in real life, a keen amateur Egyptiologist and (as has been said above) he was working on his own Egypt-based adventure at the time, so the "cameo part" he's playing on the Cigars cover is particularly apt.
yamilah
Member
#12 · Posted: 4 Feb 2007 18:06 · Edited by: yamilah
Balthazar
So presumeably, this is the basis on which Jacobs was working for Hergé when he was helping to redraw and colour Cigars in the mid-fifties.

I have a doubt about Jacobs assisting Herge for Cigars of the Pharaoh book, a doubt that seems confirmed on
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Pierre_Jacobs

Excerpt: Jacobs "became a stage painter for a theatre adaptation for Hergé's Cigars of the Pharaoh. Although the play was only a modest success, it brought him into contact with Hergé and the two quickly become friends. As a direct result, he assisted Hergé in the recasting of his earlier albums Tintin in the Congo, Tintin in America, King Ottokar's Sceptre and The Blue Lotus for book publication. After the project, he continued to contribute directly in the drawing as well as the storyline for the new Tintin double-albums The Secret of the Unicorn / Red Rackham's Treasure and The Seven Crystal Balls / Prisoners of the Sun".
This makes eight books.

According to Assouline, Jacobs met Herge for the first time in 1941, and assisted him for 'seven' books.

Herge's somehow constraining* attitude towards Jacobs went on at the time of 'Tintin magazine', as he asked him to modify and even barred some covers drawn for the pre-publication of La Marque Jaune.


To come back to Jacobs' HERGE - & Ca, this has no meaning in French (we write '& Cie' to mean '& Co'); does & Ca mean anything in English?

Thanks in advance.
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#13 · Posted: 5 Feb 2007 02:23
yamilah
I have a doubt about Jacobs assisting Herge for Cigars of the Pharaoh book, a doubt that seems confirmed on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Pierre_Jacobs
Excerpt: Jacobs “became a stage painter for a theatre adaptation for Hergé's Cigars of the Pharaoh. Although the play was only a modest success, it brought him into contact with Hergé and the two quickly become friends…”


I've read that Hergé and Jacobs first became acquainted during the theatre play Tintin aux Indes, also known as Le mystère du diamant bleu. It's the first time I’ve heard of them meeting at an adaptation for Cigars of the Pharaoh. As far as I’m concerned, that particular piece of Wiki info is wrong, so I wouldn't be inclined to believe anything else in the article!

We’ve established that Hergé stopped working closely with Hergé in 1947. I’ve also heard that he worked on his first Blake and Mortimer story, Le Secret de l'Espadon, in his spare time from helping Hergé with Prisoners of the Sun, so he was a busy man. Balthazar has reminded us (from the H. Thompson book, albeit another unreliable source!), that after their “bust-up” Jacobs continued to work for Hergé as a paid jobber. Unfortunately I can't find the reference that led me to believe Jacobs contributed to the re-worked Cigars – perhaps he didn’t - but it seems entirely possible given the ‘collective’ nature of the Studios. Personally, until it’s been confirmed either way by a reliable source I prefer to keep an open mind.

Incidentally, I’ve realised since my first post that Le Mystère de la Grande Pyramide was originally serialised in Tintin magazine from 1950 and wasn’t published in book form until 1954-55.

HERGE - & Ca, this has no meaning in French (we write '& Cie' to mean '& Co'); does & Ca mean anything in English?

I agree, it does look a bit like an ‘a’ rather than an ‘o’
See my blow-up scan.

CA can be used as an abbreviation for California in English. Perhaps it means chartered accountants? Or maybe it’s ‘Ça’, meaning ‘Hergé & that’?

The mystery continues…
jock123
Moderator
#14 · Posted: 5 Feb 2007 09:30
From the blow up of the scan, I think it looks more like “Cie” than anything else.
yamilah
Member
#15 · Posted: 5 Feb 2007 21:39 · Edited by: yamilah
As there's no cedilla nor dot, this HERGE - & Ca could mean HERGE - & Companha (HERGE & Co) in Portuguese*.

Maybe this is just a spelling mistake, but who knows?

* the 1st language barrier ever crossed by Tintin's name, that turned into one two-syllable Tim-Tim* in 1936.

see http://www.portugalvirtual.pt/0/idx/idxcies-m.html
and http://www.c7nema.ws/bd97/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&art id=35 (before last section)
yamilah
Member
#16 · Posted: 6 Feb 2007 17:49 · Edited by: yamilah
Harrock n roll
Unfortunately I can't find the reference that led me to believe Jacobs contributed to the re-worked Cigars

In Herge, by the end of Chapter 6 (1940-1944), Assouline mentions that after re-working on Congo, Herge and Jacobs started it with Cigars, Lotus & Ottokar's Sceptre.

Later, at about 1/3 of Chapter 9 (1950-1958), the author mentions -among others- the removal of the serpents scene from Cigars, and the redrawing of all this album's planes, the latter by Jacques Martin (at the time of the Studios).

Thus the definitive Cigars actually seems to be the work of Herge, EP Jacobs and J Martin.


PS: Thanks for scanning '& Ca'!
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#17 · Posted: 6 Feb 2007 18:05
It sounds like Jacobs started to work on the aborted 1946 re-working of Cigars - an extract from the first page is reproduced in the Making of Tintin book. But on this evidence I couldn't say that he'd had anything to do artistically with the modern 1955 version.

Ed
yamilah
Member
#18 · Posted: 6 Feb 2007 18:31 · Edited by: yamilah
edcharlesadams
an extract from the first page is reproduced in the Making of Tintin book.

I'm afraid these books don't exist in French!
Can one find that page you mentioned somewhere else?

It seems that even in Assouline's book things aren't quite clear-cut about who did what in Cigars...
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#19 · Posted: 6 Feb 2007 18:53
I'm afraid these books don't exist in French!
Can one find that page you mentioned somewhere else?


I believe it's in the relevant volume of the Oeuvre Integrale de Hergé series by Rombaldi, though I don't have that to hand at the moment. The commentary is by Benoit Peeters.

Ed
yamilah
Member
#20 · Posted: 6 Feb 2007 19:01
edcharlesadams
I believe it's in the relevant volume of the Oeuvre Integrale de Hergé series by Rombaldi

Thanks Ed, I'll go to the library!

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