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tintinsgf
Member
#41 · Posted: 3 Dec 2011 15:23
I knew Jules Verne since I was a little child, yet I read his novel for the first time when I was at high school. It was Around the World in Eighty Days. I became instantly hooked to Jules Verne right after I finished reading that book. I totally recommend that book, it's awesome! And long after I read his book, I often think that sometimes vibes in Jules Verne's novels resonances in Tintin's adventure, although I don't really know, what are those vibes, and how they are related to each other, from Verne's novels to Hergé's Tintin album. Not that I say Hergé copied materials in Verne's novel entirely to Tintin adventures, I just say that Tintin's adventures and Jules Verne's novels have something in common, and it is their "vibes".

Sorry for being stingy or something, but I really need to say several things. Just my humble opinion anyway.
jock123
I don't really like what you said about Jules Verne copying Hergé. I am really displeased with it, even if you just mean it as a joke. You might be not too fond of him, but still, just respect him anyway. (I am seriously irritated looking at that post, just so you know).
zaveri_tintin
Alright I knew you are irritated by Jules Verne, but if you do so, why would you still post a message in this thread at the first place anyway?
This thread, as far as I remember, is for those who LOVE Jules Verne's works, NOT those who CONDEMN or even HATE them at the utmost intensity. So, if you pleas, next time you visit a thread with a topic you didn't like (or to be precise, you hate), don't even post about your hatred on that thread. You might disturb other people's feeling of joy of liking it. (note that showing hatred is entirely different from showing disagreement!)

Ah, sorry for the word vomit.
jock123
Moderator
#42 · Posted: 3 Dec 2011 16:59
tintinsgf:
I don't really like what you said about Jules Verne copying Hergé. I am really displeased with it, even if you just mean it as a joke. You might be not too fond of him, but still, just respect him anyway. (I am seriously irritated looking at that post, just so you know).

Well obviously it isn’t my intention to irritate you, but as you say, my post is obviously a joke, and I feel justified in having made the comment in a lighthearted manner, especially as in the four years since I made it, it has failed to cause any comment.
As to who I am “not too fond of”, I don’t understand the remark, given that I actually like both Jules Verne and Hergé, and I can’t see how you arrived at the conclusion you came to.

tintinsgf:
This thread, as far as I remember, is for those who LOVE Jules Verne's works, NOT those who CONDEMN or even HATE them at the utmost intensity.

This is a more serious point.

Firstly, please do not use a thread to dictate what is, and isn’t appropriate; that’s the job of the moderators and Admin, and if they feel it necessary, they will take steps to control members who act inappropriately.
Secondly, there is nothing which says that this thread is dedicated to worship of Jules Verne, and only open to those who are uncritical of him: we run open forums, within the terms and conditions which all members agree to when they join, and, within those terms, it is just as fair for someone to offer an entirely antithetical position as it would be for someone else to gush about his genius.
You may not like their point of view (which is, upon re-reading their post not exactly as you interpret it, as it doesn’t express hatred, as you put it), but you have to let them have their say too.
Harry Hayfield
Member
#43 · Posted: 3 Dec 2011 19:07 · Edited by: Harry Hayfield
As a member of an international society and online forum about the works of Jules Verne (not to mention having blogged on a number of Vernian characters) I have to admit at first hand I cannot see much of a connection between Tintin and the works of Jules Verne. I suppose that some people might say "Off on a Comet" and "From the Earth to the Moon and Back" have a connection to "The Shooting Star" and "Destination / Explorers on the Moon" but would point out that "Off on a Comet" was about a comet slicing part of Earth off (not crashing into Earth) and in the Verne novels about the moon, the adventurers never actually landed.

Jules Verne Forum
North American Jules Verne Society
jock123
Moderator
#44 · Posted: 3 Dec 2011 19:12 · Edited by: jock123
Harry Hayfield:
Assistance: Is it permissible to post a link to the Society and Forum mentioned?

Just drop an e-mail to the team with the details, and we’ll take a look first, but I don’t anticipate a problem!
tintinsgf
Member
#45 · Posted: 21 Jan 2012 11:25
Well, thank you very much for the reminder, mr. Moderator :). I should have been more calm down while online (not only here, every where).

I was just pointing out something like "If you don't like it, don't talk about it", yet apparently I was out of control (not mentioning that I didn't really think well).

Anyway, I've opened North American Jules Verne Society, but I can't see the link to the forums. Can someone here help me about this?
Tintinrulz
Member
#46 · Posted: 21 Jan 2012 14:03 · Edited by: Tintinrulz
Herge, Son of Tintin by Benoit Peeters suggests it was one of Herge's first assistants - the first Jacques (can't remember his surname) who permeated the Tintin adventures with inspiration from Jules Verne, especially during the war years. Apparently, Herge wasn't much of a reader at that time.
mct16
Member
#47 · Posted: 21 Jan 2012 17:27 · Edited by: mct16
Tintinrulz:
the first Jacques (can't remember his surname)

Jacques Van Melkebeke, who is quoted as saying that, when they first met, Herge had only read three novels. Herge himself admitted to not having read Jules Vernes in a 1979 interview.

Mind you, Herge got a lot of his inspiration from news and current affairs and it may have been that aspect of it that make it appealing to both adults and children.

Harry Hayfield:
I cannot see much of a connection between Tintin and the works of Jules Verne. I suppose that some people might say "Off on a Comet" and "From the Earth to the Moon and Back" have a connection to "The Shooting Star"

Apparently "Off on a Comet" features a scene with a spider and a telescope which Tintin himself experiences in "Shooting Star" (but I haven't read the Vernes story myself) and the fast-growing trees and mushrooms on the meteorite come from another Vernes story "Dr. Ox's Experiment".
Harry Hayfield
Member
#48 · Posted: 21 Jan 2012 21:10
tintinsgf:
Anyway, I've opened North American Jules Verne Society, but I can't see the link to the forums. Can someone here help me about this?

You need to read the front page of the Forum website very carefully, when you have done you will be able to access the Forum
mct16
Member
#49 · Posted: 18 May 2012 12:27 · Edited by: mct16
I've been reading an extract from the Archives Tintin which mention the scene in "Broken Ear" when Ridgewell uses ventriloquism in order to make his enemies' idol speak and thus compel them to release him and Tintin.

This is similar to a scene in Verne's "Caesar Cascabel" in which the titular hero uses a similar trick on some hostile natives. However, the writers of the Archives Tintin point out that Herge only ever read Verne's "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" and found it so unrealistic that he avoided reading any more of his novels.

They suggest that if Herge had heard of the "Caesar Cascabel" scene then it would have been through word-of-mouth or by reading an article that mentioned it - a critic's review or a chapter of "Cascabel" being published in a magazine or something.
Momber
Member
#50 · Posted: 21 May 2012 16:35 · Edited by: Momber
I thought that Ridgewell was inspired by Colonel Fawcett who vanished on his 4th (I think) expedition in the Amazon (1924 or 25). During the next few years several people went on expeditions to find him, but came back with-out definite proof of what became of him. His son Brian Fawcett wrote an excellent book called "Exploration Fawcett" about the expeditions of his father. It is still in print and available from Amazon. A fantastic book full of exciting adventures in the Amazon rainforest!

It was because of Tintin and Jules Verne that I became interested in travelogues in far away exotic places and survival memoirs. Non-fiction that reads almost like fiction!

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