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Favorite Non-Tintin Adventure Stories

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catintinut
Member
#11 · Posted: 4 Dec 2009 13:56
I like The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan. It is almost something Tintin would have done. The Hitchcock movie is great too!!!
Lister
Member
#12 · Posted: 5 Dec 2009 06:36
I also like R.L Stevenson, as well as H. Rider Haggard, the author of "She" and "King Solomon's mines". In my opinion a lot of the best adventure writing comes from personal accounts, such as the diaries of James Cook and Shackleton, or "The Seven Pillars of Wisdom" by TE Lawrence.

I also like the "Flashman" series by George Macdonald Frasier. Oh, and one more- Biggles, flying ace :)
NikkiRoux
Member
#13 · Posted: 5 Dec 2009 11:50
Skulduggery Pleasant's another one I like. I've only read the first book, and it has wizards and magic and a skeleton detective who dresses in suits. I think it's funny and I got a surprise when Wikipedia said that one of its themes was horror, but that's all right. I read reviews from some children who have read it before and they made me feel a bit immature because their ages ranged from around ten to thirteen.
cigars of the beeper
Member
#14 · Posted: 7 Dec 2009 21:38
Lister:
I also like R.L Stevenson, as well as H. Rider Haggard, the author of "She" and "King Solomon's mines". In my opinion a lot of the best adventure writing comes from personal accounts, such as the diaries of James Cook and Shackleton, or "The Seven Pillars of Wisdom" by TE Lawrence.

That's funny. I just read She a couple of weeks ago. That was the third Haggard book I've read, the first two being King Solomon's mines and Allan Quatermain.

As for Robert Louis Stevenson, I especially like his short stories, such as The Bottle Imp and Markheim.
Lister
Member
#15 · Posted: 8 Dec 2009 10:40
"She" and "King Solomon's" were pretty amusing to me, because the plots were outrageous but the narration was so deadpan. They are hard to put down though.

I prefer R.L, but have yet to read his short stories, having only got so far as Kidnapped and Treasure Island.

On a Tintin related note, there is a book called "Brazilian Adventure" which reminds me of "The Broken Ear", except that it is an account of an actual search for a British archaeologist named Percy Fawcett, who dissapeared in 1925. Does anyone know whether Herge based the character Ridgewell on this case?
cigars of the beeper
Member
#16 · Posted: 9 Dec 2009 19:34
Lister:
I prefer R.L, but have yet to read his short stories, having only got so far as Kidnapped and Treasure Island.

You really should check out those short stories. They are quite wonderful. I actually like them better than Stevenson's novels.
catintinut
Member
#17 · Posted: 11 Dec 2009 15:34
Jules Verne's Mysterious Island. Not as adventurous as Tintin or many others, for that matter, but shows strong ties. The main characters are a scientist, a sailor, a reporter, a boy, and a dog (!)

Also The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy. In The Blue Lotus, Tintin and Mr Wang use the same tactic to escape the Japanese that The Scarlet Pimpernel did to save innocent but condemned aristocrats. (When they stole an armoured car)

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