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[Moved] Plain English renderings

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yamilah
Member
#1 · Posted: 1 Sep 2005 14:01 · Edited by: yamilah
As some of my threads might be obscure about 'jeu de piste', could please someone tell here what is/are the correct English rendering/s for this French expression used for a competition based on the tracking of data able to lead to other data, etc, namely a chase based on an intangible but intellectual Ariadne's thread?
As a boy scout, Herge certainly did some of those!

Are 'tracking game' and 'paper chase' both correct?
Are there other or better expressions?

Thanks in advance for your help!
jockosjungle
Member
#2 · Posted: 1 Sep 2005 17:24
Never heard the term Tracking Game, the term paper chase seems more appropriate

Rik
jock123
Moderator
#3 · Posted: 1 Sep 2005 21:10 · Edited by: jock123
jockosjungle
Never heard the term Tracking Game

“Tracking” or the “tracking game” is (or was, it is a long time since I was a Cub) the name of a game played widely in the Cubs and Scouts, where a leader would set a trail (often chalk marks), and a party following behind had to find them - it would, as Yamilah says, be appropriate in as much as Hergé was a life-long advocate of “le scoutisme”.

A paper chase definitely has to be done by dropping paper, so I think that may be a bit too specific… Otherwise it could be a treasure hunt.
yamilah
Member
#4 · Posted: 2 Sep 2005 19:44
jock123

Thanks for confirming 'tracking game' and suggesting 'treasure hunt'...

Both seem fit to render Tintin's adventures and ...'jeu de piste'.
yamilah
Member
#5 · Posted: 8 Oct 2005 14:48
Please could someone tell us what is an 'anal ornithologist'???

This expression was mentioned on the 7th Oct. 2005 in 'Flight 714: name of bird' thread; googling didn't help.

Thanks in advance.
Richard
UK Correspondent
#6 · Posted: 8 Oct 2005 22:43
yamilah
Please could someone tell us what is an 'anal ornithologist'???

Basically someone who knows an almost obsessive amount of information about birds and their habits. It's certainly not a literal phrase !
yamilah
Member
#7 · Posted: 9 Oct 2005 18:09
Richard
It's certainly not a literal phrase !

Thanks for your answer, Richard.
What a relief!
yamilah
Member
#8 · Posted: 17 Feb 2006 11:58 · Edited by: yamilah
Could someone be so kind to give here the English rendering (in Alph-Art) of French "ca ne sert (strictement) a rien (du tout)", a reply made by Haddock to four people (Calculus, the Thompsons, Jolyon Wagg and Nestor) when they ask him about the utility of the PersonAlph-Art sculpture he bought from Ramo Nash? (Alph-Art p.12-15 in 2004 edition).

Thanks in advance.
marsbar
Moderator
#9 · Posted: 17 Feb 2006 12:18
Extracted from the 2004 Engilsh language edition:
Wagg: So what's that whasit for, then?
Haddock: It is a work of art. It is Alph-Art. It is by Ramo Nash and it is for absolutely nothing at all.
yamilah
Member
#10 · Posted: 7 May 2006 15:47
Please what does Red Rackham Treasure's English version read just after a journalist overhears the Sirius cook's words?

Original text:
'Les murs ont des oreilles, ici.' (p.1, last frame).

Thanks in advance.

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