Tintin Forums

Tintin Forums / The Members Lounge /

[Moved] Plain English renderings

Page  Page 5 of 5:  « Previous  1  2  3  4  5 

jock123
Moderator
#41 · Posted: 15 Nov 2006 12:27 · Edited by: jock123
Balthazar
the professor's interests are ones he shares with the frogman community - wreck exploration, underwater piano playing, frollicking with dolphins etc.
Don’t forget extreme ironing! It all hangs together, doesn’t it?

let's not forget that one of its pioneers, Jacques Cousteau, was an active member of the French resistance.
And doesn’t Commander Lionel ‘Buster’ Crabb GM, OBE, RNVR serve as the basis for Hergé’s limpet-mining diver who comes a cropper?
Balthazar
Moderator
#42 · Posted: 15 Nov 2006 13:37 · Edited by: Balthazar
jock123
Don't forget extreme ironing

The entire plot of Tintin in Tibet, in Hergé's original French language version, actually revolves around extreme ironing, a sport about which Tintin is passionate. The English translators took all the extreme ironing references out as, at the time, it was feared that British readers just wouldn't understand what was then an exclusively Belgian activity.

In the original version, the book starts with Tintin returning from a glorious day's extreme ironing in the Alps. (Note how neat his clothes are.) That's why Snowy is grumbling and why Captain Haddock is seen giving Tintin such a hard time back at the hotel - Snowy and the Captain both think extreme ironing is silly. But Tintin sticks to his guns, and when he finds that Chang has been caught up in an air crash in the Himalayas, he is very upset about how creased Chang's clothes will be - that's why he's crying. Against all the odds he persuades the Captain to accompany him to Nepal on the extreme ironing challenge of a lifetime, and the Captain eventually persuades Tharkey and the sherpas to lug a load of ironing boards up into the mountains. (That's why the packs are so big.) Just as Tintin is about to give up, after the sherpas have deserted, he spots a creased yellow scarf on the rockface and simply has to get up there to give it a quick once-over with the travel iron he still has in his rucksack. "It'll need a thorough pressing on steam-setting number 6 (woollens-acrylics)," he says as he scales the sheer cliff. When he finally finds Chang, all that dialogue between them in that emotional scene in the cave is about the terrible state of Chang's clothes. As you can see, by the time they leave for home, Tintin has sorted Chang's clothes out (possibly with the aid of a Corby trouser press which the monks lend him).

As you'll now appreciate, Michael Turner and Leslie Lonsdale-Cooper had to rewrite huge amounts of dialogue throughout the book to make it seem that the story was all about Tintin wanting to rescue Chang from the aftermath of the aircrash, or somesuch slush. This translated version completely misses the very personal vision of Hergé's original. (Georges Remi was a great extreme ironer in his youth.) You have to read Tintin in the original French to really understand it.
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#43 · Posted: 15 Nov 2006 19:06
Note that posts concerning Professor Paul Cantonneau have branched into this thread.
jock123
Moderator
#44 · Posted: 16 Nov 2006 12:29
Balthazar
The entire plot of Tintin in Tibet, in Hergé's original French language version, actually revolves around extreme ironing…
It’s scholarship like this that makes the ’net what it is today! ;-)

Page  Page 5 of 5:  « Previous  1  2  3  4  5 

Please be sure to familiarize yourself with the Forum Posting Guidelines.

Disclaimer: Tintinologist.org assumes no responsibility for any content you post to the forums/web site. Staff reserve the right to remove any submitted content which they deem in breach of Tintinologist.org's Terms of Use. If you spot anything on Tintinologist.org that you think is inappropriate, please alert the moderation team. Sometimes things slip through, but we will always act swiftly to remove unauthorised material.

Reply



  Forgot your password?
Please sign in to post. New here? Sign up!