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“Hergé - Chronologie d'une oeuvre”: Tome/ Volume 5 released

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Richard
UK Correspondent
#31 · Posted: 21 Jan 2005 18:59
E.H. Shepard's drawings thrown into the corridor as rubbish ?! The world's gone mad. I wasn't as closely acquainted with his work for "Winnie the Pooh" when I was little, but I remember vividly his illustrations for "The Wind in the Willows" - especially, for some reason, the one of Toad walking out of the prison gates dressed as a washerwoman.

I like the idea of the Taschen-style books very much, although the text would have needed to be shrunk down considerably to fit multiple translations onto each page.

Another idea, which is perhaps more feasible, would be for Moulinsart to produce what can best be described as a "greatest hits album". Taking the best material from each of the Chronologies (tough choice, I know !), putting together maybe one large volume comprising of work from the entire series. Perhaps around the size of "Hergé & Tintin Reporters", employing multiple-translations on the same page, and it would chart the history of Tintin and Hergé visually. Even better if it could be released in 2007 to coincide with Hergé's 100th anniversary !
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#32 · Posted: 22 Jan 2005 02:00 · Edited by: Harrock n roll
Richard observed: The world's gone mad.

As they appear to be using Frank Hampson originals as duck-boards these days it surely must have !

It may seem odd now but I suppose at the time it was thought that once the printing plates for a book had been made - or it had been printed as with comics - the artwork was useless to them. And because the publisher pays for the work it's their property to do with as they please. (I worked for a publishers which never threw anything away, although they should have - it was all rubbish!) I wonder what the case was with Hergé's work - whether Casterman held onto it or he got it sent back.

Maybe someone can correct me on this but I think with a few of the books (The Broken Ear to Crab?) the originals no longer exist because when Hergé reset them for the 62 page format he cut them up. And with a few of the books there are 2 “originals” because he took a photostat and worked from that.

Another great thing I love in the Chronologie 5 are the pages from the scrapbook Hergé kept for the Le Soir strip of Crystal Balls. He must have cut them out everyday as they appeared. You can see he then used it to work out his editing for the book version; delete this frame, alter that one, make a note here... Meticulous!

By the way, top idea about the “best of” chronologie Richard! Any chance you could get a job at Egmont?...
jock123
Moderator
#33 · Posted: 22 Jan 2005 09:20 · Edited by: jock123
Blue Lotus certainly is now in the “second generation” original format - “gen 1” art cut up and pasted onto new board with additions to form the basis of the colour book - as that is how it is exhibited. I’m sure the same occurred for other books, as there were pages on display from Crab at Greenwich which showed this too.

The Chronologie benefits immensely from the nature of Hergé and his habitual re-use of things: if he had decided to re-draw from scratch, he might have discarded the earlier material completely; because it might have future use, he stored it.
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#34 · Posted: 22 Jan 2005 11:00
Blue Lotus certainly is now in the “second generation” original format - “gen 1” art cut up and pasted onto new board with additions to form the basis of the colour book - as that is how it is exhibited. I’m sure the same occurred for other books, as there were pages on display from Crab at Greenwich which showed this too.


Actually, I think the “first generation” artwork still exists for Lotus, definitely. I only know that for sure because I've seen it. It was probably the highlight of the '89 Chelsea Town Hall exhibition, one room dedicated to the entire original Blue Lotus inks. Crab I think was cut-up, at least I studied some of the inks close-up at the '89 exhibition and it looked like the original artwork but again it's hard to tell.
jock123
Moderator
#35 · Posted: 22 Jan 2005 17:00
I stand corrected, Chris. I saw it in Haarlem a few years ago now, so I can’t claim to have studied it at length; I must have mis-remembered, or given undue weight to what might have been a contemporary emendation by Hergé.

As you say, it is a very impressive sight to see, and I was surprised to read elsewhere someone say in a report that they thought it was a dull exhibit; I’m not even a number one fan of the book, and it blew me away just what a monumental effort it was for one man (with contributory work from Tchang, of course! And was Jacobs involved in this one?) to keep such high standards, whilst virtually inventing the form he was working in before our very eyes! He may have had the studio later, but boy had he come a long way since Soviets, and gosh he could really draw!!

This is actually a key point: Hergé is about telling a story through images. For those who worry about the Chronologie being in French only, I should confess that I spend so long looking at the pictures, and soaking up the detail, that the words have scarcely troubled me!
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#36 · Posted: 23 Jan 2005 16:26
jock123 said: For those who worry about the Chronologie being in French only, I should confess that I spend so long looking at the pictures, and soaking up the detail, that the words have scarcely troubled me!

I second that! Even if you can't speak a word in French these books will amaze you, although they're probably more for the seasoned Tintinologist than the “casual” fan.

Back to the point about cut-ups; it does seem strange as from what I can tell Hergé used his original artwork from the Le Soir strip of Crystal Balls to make the book version so that the only surviving original bits are the ones that didn't make the book. And yet he began to do the Lotus at around the same time without cutting up the original. Whatever the reason, Jacobs was involved in the 1944 “remake” rather than the earlier version. Much of the Lotus remake is included in volume 5.

Another reason that makes the Chronologie books so interesting is that they are a chronology, so that you can see what Hergé was working on month by month, year by year. You can see how Hergé was able to change his drawing style to suit the book he was working on. For example, he was redrawing Congo at the same time as working on Crystal Balls
Richard
UK Correspondent
#37 · Posted: 13 Apr 2005 23:00
Just came across this and thought people might be interested to see it. The 'deluxe' edition of Chronologie #5 consists of the book, plus this image here, of the colouring process of the original title page image of Les 7 Boules de Cristal.
jockosjungle
Member
#38 · Posted: 14 Apr 2005 06:53
I went for the first volume off amazon, incidently the 5th volume is now 99 euros as well

Rik
Tintinrulz
Member
#39 · Posted: 14 Apr 2005 07:51 · Edited by: Tintinrulz
Does volume 1 in this series have any rare Tintin pics? Also I've read that Soviets was quite violent and Herge had to calm it down for the published version. (Tintin: Herge and His Creation, I think). Is this true?

Wowsers! Vol. 1, 2 and 4 are up for grabs on ebay.com.au
http://search.ebay.com.au/Herge-Chronologie-dune-Oeuvre_Books-Comics-Mags_W0QQfkrZ1QQfromZR8QQsacatZ 267QQsatitleZHergeQ3aQ20ChronologieQ20dQ27uneQ20Oeuvre
tintinuk
Moderator Emeritus
#40 · Posted: 14 Apr 2005 07:56
Volume 1 doesn't really have that much Tintin, although it's still interesting to look at and definitely tracking down, as it shows the gradual development of Hergé - it evens contains the first ever drawing by Georges Remi (on the back of a postcard at the age of 3) ! ;o)

I've never heard anything about Soviets being more violent (I'm sure rare pages would have surfaced) and I don't recall anything about it from Tintin : Hergé and His Creation - but I could be wrong ! I'll check later on ...

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