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Captain Haddock's whisky

jock123
Moderator
#1 · Posted: 4 Jun 2004 16:20
Just thought I’d post the following link:

http://www.lochlomonddistillery.com/products.htm

You might notice that they have just released their last stocks of a special 1966 whisky. I think the “Black Island” was re-drawn in 1965 - could Tintin have been hanging onto the very tanker, before the whisky was laid down?

Coming from the North East, it is a little galling that Captain Haddock drank a lowland whisky and not a Speyside, but still, it is interesting to know his tipple is for sale (although only in Germany, by the looks of it).

PS: I know that MT&LL-C suggested the name be used without realising there was an actual whisky, but as was said a Greenwich, Hergé loved coincidences!
fripp
Member
#2 · Posted: 3 Jul 2004 10:48
FYI. In the first edition of the swedish translations, it was the word Whisky was deemed too dangerous for small children. It was replaced with a word which losely translated means "party brew".
How silly is that?
jock123
Moderator
#3 · Posted: 4 Jul 2004 08:42
LOL! It actually conjures up a picture to me of something even stronger than whisky - made in a secret still or a bath-tub during prohibition - so I wonder what they were thinking of?

Do Swedes serve anything called “party brew” to children, thus taking the emphasis off the alcoholic nature of the Captain’s drinking? Or is the effect maybe closer to him using a slang word like “hooch” in English, where it would be in character, even if the drink he had was in fact a regular bottled whisky?
GurraJG
Member
#4 · Posted: 4 Jul 2004 15:22
fripp
In the first edition of the swedish translations, it was the word Whisky was deemed too dangerous for small children. It was replaced with a word which losely translated means "party brew".

Really? I never saw that before, and I have quite a lot of Swedish Tintin albums.

-Gustav
fripp
Member
#5 · Posted: 5 Jul 2004 23:24
Gustav,

The word used was "Kalasmust". I don't have any copies myself but I believe it was when Carlsen IF published Tintin. I think I saw in the the Secret of the Unicorn.

Jock,
The word is a made up word and it sounds really childish, something along the lines of punch served at a childrens party. Not sinister at all, I'm afraid. it just a piece of the good old swedish big brother mentality for you.

/fripp
GurraJG
Member
#6 · Posted: 5 Aug 2004 15:50
fripp
The word used was "Kalasmust". I don't have any copies myself but I believe it was when Carlsen IF published Tintin. I think I saw in the the Secret of the Unicorn.

Right, I figured it out. A couple of days ago DN (a Swedish newpaper) published an article about Tintin. In it the whole thing is explained. In the earliest translation (out of 3) it's "party brew". Later, in the second edition, as well as the newest, it's whisky.


jock123
Do Swedes serve anything called “party brew” to children, thus taking the emphasis off the alcoholic nature of the Captain’s drinking?

No, the closest thing to "Kalasmust" is "Julmust", which is a type of softdrink we serve at Christmas.

-Gustav

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