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After Alph-art?

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number1fan
Member
#1 · Posted: 12 Jun 2008 16:29
After that adventure what could have been next for Tintin and Haddock.Maybe back to the middle east.
cigars of the beeper
Member
#2 · Posted: 12 Jun 2008 20:36
No telling what would come next.
IvanIvanovitch
Member
#3 · Posted: 12 Jun 2008 21:46
I think Alph-Art was to be the last book. It has an air of finality about it (besides the fact that the author died writing it!).
number1fan
Member
#4 · Posted: 13 Jun 2008 13:26
so you could say that Tintin may have killed Herge with the stress of making the adventures.
cigars of the beeper
Member
#5 · Posted: 13 Jun 2008 21:39
Well, it was very stressful for Herge to write Tintin. He even had nervous breakdowns once or twice. (one was during Explorers on the Moon)
Balthazar
Moderator
#6 · Posted: 14 Jun 2008 15:12 · Edited by: Balthazar
number1fan wrote:
so you could say that Tintin may have killed Herge with the stress of making the adventures.


If Hergé had died at his drawing board during the 1950s, his health broken by overwork, you'd have a point. As Cigars points out, he had nervous breakdowns during his periods of overwork, and maybe felt then that Tintin was in danger of killing him. (There's that well known drawing he did of himself at the drawing board with Tintin standing over him with a cat-o'-nine-tails whip.) Quite a few famous strip cartoonists have damaged their mental and/or physical health through overwork and probably died younger than they might have, eg: Winsor McKay, Frank Hampson, Dudley D Watkins. It seems to be an occupational hazard.

But surely Hergé is an example of of a strip-cartoonist who escaped from this hazard. He gave up churning out Tintin adventures at such a gruelling rate, produced just a few books in his later decades, enjoyed a relaxed lifestyle, and lived to quite a good age. He died of medical problems which don't seem to have been related to the overwork and stress of his earlier years. So I don't think it's true to say that Tintin killed him.
tintinspartan
Member
#7 · Posted: 16 Jun 2008 20:03
Well not mentally but physically. Correct me if i'm wrong but I do heard that he had something wrong with his bones years before his death and that may have been caused by him sitting in a bad position drawing the comic.

After Alph-art, maybe if you want to take into account Frederic Tuten's spin-off, Tintin In The New World as an answer.
IvanIvanovitch
Member
#8 · Posted: 18 Jun 2008 05:16
AUGH! Mention not that accursed volume. Wipe its name from history; blot it out! Tintin in the New World is blasphemy. The drawing's not that good either.
SmartTintin
Member
#9 · Posted: 20 Jun 2008 08:01
IvanIvanovitch:
AUGH! Mention not that accursed volume. Wipe its name from history; blot it out! Tintin in the New World is blasphemy.

That's very true! No Tintin fan would like to see Tintin in a new world with romance and stuff. He is much better off in his old world, forever young, doing what he does best, without any romantic link-ups. I agree on your point to wipe off that novel from the history of Tintin related books.
cigars of the beeper
Member
#10 · Posted: 20 Jun 2008 13:02
I am sure that I will never read Tintin in the New World, seeing as people hated it, and I'm also sure that Breaking Free wouldn't be a good successor to Alph-Art, either.

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