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Ellipse-Nelvana: Remastered DVD Boxset

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Danagasta
Member
#11 · Posted: 4 Sep 2006 01:29 · Edited by: Danagasta
Weeeeeell, jockosjungle, I'm guessing that the program I used somehow realigns the information contained in the image to fit. Like number1fan said, it seems that the color gets brighter, so maybe it adds information to fill in what would otherwise be missing. Like any other MPEG video or audio, I'm guessing there's an algorithm involved that would add in what seemed to be "missing" when the file was compressed. That would be one way of explaining why the colors seemed so much more vivid.
jock123
Moderator
#12 · Posted: 4 Sep 2006 09:36
Danagasta
Weeeeeell, jockosjungle, I'm guessing that the program I used somehow realigns the information contained in the image to fit.

I think the question that was being posed was more one of how does the program know what to put in the picture on either side of the frame - trees, houses, cars, other scenery and characters, that sort of thing? In the case of the Tintin series, for example, the image that the animators worked to was presumably 4:3 (or there abouts). So if they didn’t create anything to expand the edges outwards for a wider picture - no backgrounds or action - what does the computer put in?

The usual way that films have been put into widescreen (“Gone With the Wind” is a classic example of an Academy ratio film which was re-released in “widescreen” in the fifties) is simply to crop the tops and bottoms of the picture off. It is far easier to lose some content which is already there, than to create something new from nothing.

Some TVs produce a pseudo-widescreen effect, by compressing the image inwards from the top and bottom, but it makes people and buildings etc. look peculiar. Realigning the data as you suggest might do it, but it sounds a complex way to do it, and would more than likely throw a lot of things out of shape.
number1fan
Member
#13 · Posted: 4 Sep 2006 13:58
I Watch my Tintin episodes in widescreen the colour is brighter and nothing is missing if anything it adds a tiny bit i have The Simpsons series 7 dvd and if i put them in widescreen mode i see a little bit more then was intended i think they should recolur the series all together becuase i think it needs it becuase Tintin is a classoc cartoon and a classic series and as for the 5.1 surround sound if you have a suround sound system like i do you can set it to dolby pro digital 2 and it will turn anything to surround sound i have a few silent films that i have turned to surround sound "the birth of a nation, hell i even watch last of the summerwine and keeping up apperance and it turns into surround sound.
jockosjungle
Member
#14 · Posted: 4 Sep 2006 18:07
Yes the most common ways is to crop the top of the image in a sort of reverse of pan and scan on fullscreen DVD, or to simply stretch the image.

It seems an expensive process to do it another way especially for only 15k copies

R
number1fan
Member
#15 · Posted: 4 Sep 2006 19:36
first put your tintin dvd on in a big tv watch a few minutes of it then go and watch it on a portable 14inch tv notice the differnce in color just thought i would mention that.
editman
Member
#16 · Posted: 5 Sep 2006 02:55 · Edited by: editman
Will buy it at the drop of a hat if they restore the recaps of all part 2 episodes for a completist's sake, but you won't know until someone actually get their hands on one.
jock123
Moderator
#17 · Posted: 5 Sep 2006 09:26
number1fan
put your tintin dvd on in a big tv watch a few minutes of it then go and watch it on a portable 14inch tv notice the differnce in color

Well I’m not certain that it is a universal given, to be honest: stand in front of your local TV dealer’s display of sets and you will see a whole range of difference in colour, brightness, sharpness etc. between sets of all sizes. Some of the small sets will be brighter than the big sets. You may see something between your two sets which others won’t get.

I get a change in effect on my TV with my digibox when I switch from composite to RGB for the signal - RGB is a better, brighter picture, although the TV, TV settings and the programme are exactly the same. Maybe that’s got something to do with it.


Meanwhile, back on topic…
editman
Will buy it at the drop of a hat if they restore the recaps of all part 2 episodes for a completist's sake
That’s a fair point; I’m not sure it would sway me personally, but I can see why you would have a reason to buy if the cartoons are your thing.
Danagasta
Member
#18 · Posted: 5 Sep 2006 14:59 · Edited by: Danagasta

I think the question that was being posed was more one of how does the program know what to put in the picture on either side of the frame - trees, houses, cars, other scenery and characters, that sort of thing? In the case of the Tintin series, for example, the image that the animators worked to was presumably 4:3 (or there abouts). So if they didn’t create anything to expand the edges outwards for a wider picture - no backgrounds or action - what does the computer put in?


It doesn't replace anything, rather it expands the images and adds missing pixels so the image can be enlarged without being lossy. It's similar to taking a JPEG and converting it to a high-resolution bitmap (used to have to do that for Adobe After Effects.) But other than that, I'm not too sure of the exact inner workings.
jockosjungle
Member
#19 · Posted: 5 Sep 2006 16:48
Watching Tintin on a widescreen TV would merely stretch the image from its original aspect ration and not offer any form of expansion.

R
dangaz
Member
#20 · Posted: 24 Sep 2006 09:00
Ok, this is my first post here, but just ran into this thread and have to say a thing or 2.

The blurb on store.tintin.com for this boxset says:
"Format 4/3 compatible with all type of screens" this means it is in a 4:3 ratio, and a 4:3 ratio being the conventional ratio for many years IS compatible with all TV screens, they are merely saying that it can be displayed on any tv, not that it will fill the whole screen of a widescreen tv.

jock123 is absolutely correct however, taking a picture that started as 4:3 and making it 16:9 REQUIRES you to either stretch the picture out, which if you watch it side by side with a conventional tv, you will see how everyone's heads are "fat" OR to cut the top and bottom off the picture.

There is no secret hidden picture off the side of a 4:3 picture that you can unlock with a widescreen tv, you are simply stretching the picture.

Also, as there was a small amount of confusion as to region, it is region 2, and the picture is PAL.

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