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[Locked] Unicorn Movie: News and general discussion

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BlackIsland
Member
#621 · Posted: 12 Oct 2011 17:59
mct16:
would be interesting to know if Spielberg and Jackson were aware of the political and social issues that Herge raised in his books. Did they come across mention of such things in the course of their research, or were they just too focused on the adventure aspects?

That’s what I am wondering because it is a HUGE part of these books. It maybe a small undercurrent but it is powerful nonetheless. It is also an aspect that could be overlooked. Look I am glad with have a film about Tintin and I will see it because other than you guys I am the biggest fan I know. I got real good at one time at just seeing one frame of the books and knowing what story it came from after years of reading them over and over. Actually I did read that Herge wanted them to adapt to the big screen after seeing Indiana Jones. I have to find the source but I did read it. Jackson is great and I liked KK in 2005, 90 percent of what he did was great. If anyone has a better handle on Tintin it would be him from what I have read. I agree about Star Wars being ruined. There are tons of message boards complaining about the new blue-ray DVD set.
mct16
Member
#622 · Posted: 12 Oct 2011 18:32
BlackIsland:
Actually I did read that Herge wanted them to adapt to the big screen after seeing Indiana Jones. I have to find the source but I did read it.

This is raised in several articles, links to which can be found here - though I imagine you've already read them, haven't you?

Basically, they claim that Herge was interested in a Spielberg version of Tintin but died just when the preliminary negotiations had begun.
Ladybird
Member
#623 · Posted: 13 Oct 2011 23:59
I apologise if this has been mentioned before but does anyone else find it odd that the writers felt the need to turn a fairly minor red herring character into the main bad guy when the books are full of plenty of great villains to choose from?

Also I know that many of the reoccurring come from (or rise to prominence in) the last half of the series but they are one of the things that makes Tintin so amazing. There are only three movies so it seems like this one could do with appearances from the Professor or Bianca.
mct16
Member
#624 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 01:29
Ladybird:
does anyone else find it odd that the writers felt the need to turn a fairly minor red herring character into the main bad guy when the books are full of plenty of great villains to choose from?

I have mentioned this myself in a post here.
jock123
Moderator
#625 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 10:22
Ladybird:
does anyone else find it odd that the writers felt the need to turn a fairly minor red herring character into the main bad guy

Not really: they will ultimately be creating a dramatic structure of their own to suit a cinema presentation, and it could be it helps them to unify the separate pieces they wish to stitch together in some way. It’s not unusual when writing movies - even supposedly true story, or historical ones - to composite characters; that is to give one character on screen a rôle based on what might have been two or three subsidiary character in a book. You have to give people more to do on stage or screen than on the printed page - if nothing else it means using one actor where you might have had to pay three, and gives that actor a better part, but also reduces the number of characters appearing and disappearing, which can lead to confusion (you only needed to sit in the screening of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, which has a large number of people introduced quite rapidly, to see a demonstration of this, as two lots of audience members kept up a running commentary of “Who was he again?”, and “Why are they there?”)
Laurence Olivier made his film of Hamlet and was happy to dispense with Hamlet’s friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern entirely, although at least one play-write has seen them as significant enough to write a play just about them; if Olivier can do that to Shakespeare, I’d say let Spielberg tinker with Tintin.
shangas
Member
#626 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 11:00
I've never known Spielberg to produce a bad film. I am extremely excited about the upcoming movie. I know it's been in the works for years, and I hope that it's a blockbuster.

The Tintin series deserves to be made into a movie-series.
Bordurian Thug
Member
#627 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 11:11 · Edited by: Bordurian Thug
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are extremely minor characters in Hamlet though; literally blink and you miss them. Stoppard's play is predicated upon their insignificance.

I find Calculus's omission the most surprising and disappointing actually. He's obviously too passive a character for the writers to work into their action-packed shoot 'em up. Red Rackham's Treasure is after all the album in which he first appears.

And as I mentioned in my earlier post, what's with this 'four hundred year old power that could have changed the course of history'? Clearly that's not simply a treasure chest. I expect it's a nod to Raiders of the Lost Ark.

I'm looking forward to seeing the movie but I expect that it will sacrifice Herge's realism upon the altar of sensationalism. That's why Haddock brandishing a rocket launcher is so galling. Yes, of course he often uses a weapon in the books but a rocket launcher?????
Richard
UK Correspondent
#628 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 18:02
Spoiler ahead!

Ladybird:
There are only three movies so it seems like this one could do with appearances from the Professor or Bianca.

According to the soundtrack listing (available here, amongst other places) the Milanese Nightingale will make an appearance in the film.
jock123
Moderator
#629 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 18:29
Bordurian Thug:
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are extremely minor characters in Hamlet though; literally blink and you miss them.

Quite pivotal in their way, though, and a presence, on and off stage from Act II onward - a bit like Haddock in Land of Black Gold… ;-)

Bordurian Thug:
I find Calculus's omission the most surprising and disappointing actually.

Is it so surprising, when he’s not actually in Unicorn? We don’t know what the outcome of this movie will be, and how much of Rackham is involved, so perhaps he’s just not part of this story?

Again, I’d put this down to dramatic balance. As I mentioned elsewhere, the possibility is that he will be a central, pivotal figure in the next film (whatever it is), and the delay is to give him his due with a decent introduction, rather than just shoe-horning in another introduction into this film.

Bordurian Thug:
I expect that it will sacrifice Herge's realism upon the altar of sensationalism.

Interesting, because whilst I see that there’s a truth to the way in which Hergé created the world his stories, I (personally) see them as largely fanciful, mostly escapist, and in their own way as sensational as Edgar Rice Burroughs or Rider-Haggard. Inca cults! Telepathic fakirs! Ancient astronauts! Giant human snowballs! Amazing hirsute bubble-blowing detectives! All the fun of the fair! ;-)

What politics he has in them is mostly for plot, and not in any real sense insightful; he uses magic and pseudoscience as much, if not more than hard science, etc. The beauty of what he does is that he draws and writes with an authority which makes the story work, and which imbues truth to what he is telling you, but he makes an atomic rocket which is ultimately no more real to me than a levitating monk, or a divining pendulum.

Bordurian Thug:
of course he often uses a weapon in the books but a rocket launcher?????

But from what we see he treats it in due Haddock fashion - he’s not a cool action hero; he’s our favourite sailor, slightly out of his depth but having a go (and getting it wrong). If anything, it’s a more traditional Haddock-y moment than the image of him on the cover of 714, with his sub-machine gun at the ready.
mct16
Member
#630 · Posted: 14 Oct 2011 19:19
jock123:
If anything, it’s a more traditional Haddock-y moment than the image of him on the cover of 714, with his sub-machine gun at the ready.

I don't have the book on me at the moment, but in "Land of Black Gold" when he calls Tintin at his flat, isn't it to announce that he's been summoned to serve on a ship as part of the mobilization for war? That would indicate that he does have some military experience and as part of that he would have been trained in the use of things like machine-guns.

But I tend to agree with the view that a bazooka is going a bit far.

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