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Tintin et Moi: Comparing the book and documentary?

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jock123
Moderator
#1 · Posted: 14 Jul 2004 23:39 · Edited by: jock123
Tintin et Moi: Entretiens Avec Hergé is the Numa Sadoul book based on the taped interviews used to create the film documentary Tintin et Moi.

It just occurred to me that the film quite clearly talks about the input and editorial intervention that Hergé made when Sadoul was transcribing and editing his book, effectively altering everything that he'd said, often more than once. This contributed to the significant delay in getting the book together, a period of some years.

Yet the film is made directly from the taped audio of the interview, which presumably is the original, un-revised version of the story. I wonder if anything which he said is significantly different to how he re-presented it in the book? Did he edit for clarity and style, or was he changing things which he thought reflected negatively on him, or which he didn't want included.

More to the point did any of this get into the film, or was it perhaps limited to using stuff that more or less agreed with the published version?

Has anyone made a comparison? I'd be interested to know.
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#2 · Posted: 15 Jul 2004 21:43
Well this is a complicated area because the actual book of "Entretiens avec Hergé" underwent several revisions over the years. The first edition was heavily edited and sanitised by Hergé. After his death in 1983 another edition added a few notes explaining the changes made but did not expand on them. The "definitive edition", giving the original interview, was published ten years after that, and that's the version you're most likely to see today, with commentary and explanations by Numa Sadoul.

As for a comparison, I think the most famous one is cited by Harry Thompson, and I quote: 'Asked whether he is travelling the world in order to flee Tintin, "Hergé" replies, "There's no question of fleeing, it's more a question of seeing and discovering new things, and recharging my batteries." Originally, "Georges Remi" had replied, "That's partly it - a need to play truant for a while, to escape from this hard labour, which feels like slavery."'

Ed
jock123
Moderator
#3 · Posted: 16 Jul 2004 12:57
Ah! Thanks Ed! That is interesting! It had been niggling at the back of my mind since Greenwich; I wasn’t aware the book had re-appeared un-expurgated. Did it undergo a title change too - gaining the “Tintin et Moi”? I seem to recall seeing it just as “Entretiens Avec Hergé”, with perhaps a blue cover?
edcharlesadams
Trivia Challenge Score Keeper
#4 · Posted: 16 Jul 2004 13:28
The original title from 1975 was "Tintin et Moi: Entretiens avec Hergé" but the "Tintin et Moi" was removed from the 1983 edition, apparently because readers were unsure as to whether the "moi" of the title referred to Numa Sadoul or Hergé. The modern reprints from about 2000 onwards have restored it.

Ed
rastapopoulos
Member
#5 · Posted: 22 Sep 2004 11:40
I found a nice atricle on 'Tintin et Moi@ on the Danish film institiute website.

http://www.dfi.dk/sitemod/moduler/index_english.asp?pid=17900
jock123
Moderator
#6 · Posted: 22 Sep 2004 13:21
rastapopoulos
I found a nice atricle on 'Tintin et Mo

That’s very interesting!

It does seem to back-up my personal feeling that the documentary was made from the point of view of someone seeking to emphasise only the melancholy side of Hergé’s life, which while being one aspect of his complex character, was not the only one.

Østergaard seems to have gone into his research with that as his agenda, rather than looking at the whole picture and working out a more rounded view.

While the “Tintin et Moi” effort is good, I’m sure that the definitive Hergé documentary is still to be made.
rastapopoulos
Member
#7 · Posted: 22 Sep 2004 14:53
I feel that was what was interesting about the documentary, the fact that Herge’s private life affected the content of his comics. The fact that Castifiore is a subconscious (or conscious?) reflection of Herge’s first wife is fascinating. You can see it in the way Haddock reacts to her presence.
These personal secrets with can be found in the comics are what make the documentary interesting. Yes Ostergaard could have trawled through the history of Herge and his work, but haven’t we heard it all before? It’s interesting that Herge censored the Sadoul interviews. That’s journalism!
jock123
Moderator
#8 · Posted: 22 Sep 2004 15:07
rastapopoulos said:

Ostergaard could have trawled through the history of Herge and his work, but haven’t we heard it all before?

Actually I thought that the whole psychological angle was the one I’d heard before; I’d like something which didn’t just focus on his neuroses, but told us about his positive side too - something where we heard about his thoughts on art and artists.

For example, the film tells us about his hope for his fine art, and his distress at its failure - but in terms of the psychology; it doesn’t tell us how he painted, where he painted or why he painted.

Also, he maintained a relationship with Mme. Hergée up until she died, so she wasn’t wholly repugnant to him. She must have meant something to him, and the documentary didn’t balance that particular set of scales.
Harrock n roll
Moderator
#9 · Posted: 22 Sep 2004 15:50 · Edited by: Harrock n roll
Jock123 said:
Østergaard seems to have gone into his research with that as his agenda, rather than looking at the whole picture and working out a more rounded view.

Whilst I agree that there were many aspects to Hergé's character, I think the central theme he chose - Hergé's nervous breakdown circa Tibet - was an interesting one, and worth exploring. In the case of Tibet we clearly see how the pressures of his private life affected his work. Being an intensely private man Tibet is the most extreme example. And it's not all gloom - it does still contain the most comprehensive biography on film to date where many other aspects to his life and work are explored. I do agree however that the "definitive" Hergé documentary is still yet to be made. I suppose you could say that the general mood of it is entirely in keeping with the Scandinavian "svår mod" melancholy!
Pelaphus
Member
#10 · Posted: 13 Oct 2004 16:24
Has the book Tintin et Moi ever been, or will it be, available in English?

Has the documentary ever been released with English subtitles as part of the image or as an option?

And if so, who's selling it?

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