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Q232: Object that spells like a country

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toydreamer
Member
#11 · Posted: 26 May 2007 21:18
1. A grenade does spell "like" Grenada.

Like does not mean the same.

2. The grenade is grey. Obviously made of metal.

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Like - As a preposition or adjective, it comes from the Middle English like meaning "similar", which in turn comes from Anglo-Saxon gelīc and Old Norse líkr. The verb "to like" came from Anglo-Saxon līcian. Both words may be related to Anglo-Saxon līc = "body", and are cognates of the modern German adjective "gleich" (=same, equal).
tuhatkauno
Member
#12 · Posted: 26 May 2007 21:33
Hello

We have walked the same paths. First I checked cars like labrador, then I thought the guinea coin like balthazar, but I couln't find any, then i reckoned, it could be a statue or a jewel and then the country could be Saint Barthelemy (Bartholomew = apostole) but in the list of countries the name was Saint Barthelemy and nothing else. I haven't found a statue or a jewel of Bartholomew either. This is very difficult Q.
toydreamer
Member
#13 · Posted: 27 May 2007 06:05 · Edited by: toydreamer
Is tough. :)

Another point - if a "Maltese Cross" can be accepted as being the name of a country - Maltese or Malta. The object in question is a Maltese Cross... not just a Maltese. You therefore couldn't not accept an item like a "tear gas grenade" as it's you'd have to accept the "grenade" part just as you do the "Maltese" part. It's still a grenade.

Just wondering where the Maltese Cross occurs, anyway??

(Just investigating possibilities, angles, etc... not trying to be a prat. ;) )
yamilah
Member
#14 · Posted: 27 May 2007 09:28 · Edited by: yamilah
Here is the answer:
In Cigars of the Pharaoh (p.38-C1), a katar can be spotted ('khouttar' in the original version, erroneously rendered by 'kukri' in the English one.
Katar (or Qatar) is an Arabic peninsular state in the Persian Gulf.

see frame on http://www.eugraph.com/tqsect/wriquiz/answers/index.html
and http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cigars_of_the_Pharaoh

see original katars and kukris on http://www.hindunet.org/saraswati/indianarms.htm
and http://www.himalayan-imports.com/faq/Historical.htm

for original frame see http://www.caroloscrabble.be/IMG/jpg/doc-40.jpg

Anybody can set the next question.

PS: for a Maltese Cross, see America, on Rastapopoulos-like man's chest, by the end.
toydreamer
Member
#15 · Posted: 27 May 2007 12:00 · Edited by: toydreamer
You didn't take any time to re-address my counter points to your decision. Would have appreciated it... as you rejected my answer on 3 different grounds.

As you didn't... I'll feel free to continue. :)

I don't think you can ask the question you did and then say in your clue that your item is "the object is not named properly in the book." Doesn't mean that people won't find items that are named in books. Your clue can't stop answers if the answer fits your question. Clearly that's not fair. Especially when a question can have many answers.

2. As I've said before "like" means similar. Therefore that part of the answer clearly fits.

3. As to the grenade being a metal object... I think the item is made of metal and could be said to be a metal object. Can i get a ruling on this?

Sorry for the working the issue over. :)

P.S. That was such an impossibly hard clue. Didn't narrow down the country as so many countries have different spellings. Also saying the object is not properly named in books is not even close to a clue.
yamilah
Member
#16 · Posted: 27 May 2007 12:15 · Edited by: yamilah
Sorry English is not my mother language... What I meant was "homographic" names, but this adjective seemed to be a bit too technical.

A grenade's spelling certainly differs from Grenada's one, but maybe you deserve a point; I suggest the admin decides about it.

Many tear gas grenades are made of plastics, in order not to harm rioters.
jock123
Moderator
#17 · Posted: 27 May 2007 23:58
I think the fact that the rules require that the questions be based on the English editions renders the issue moot: if the object isn’t identified as a katar in the book, but as a kukri, then for our purposes a kukri it is (just as Moulinsart is Marlinspike because that is how it is in the English books).
To expect people to be in a position to interpret that the question required a mis-attributed object to be correctly re-identified, then that the name was to be linked to a country that is almost always spelled completely differently I’m afraid just doesn’t seem reasonable, or even very sporting. It would have been difficult enough if the fact that the search was for an item which was given the wrong name had actually been included at the start; for that, and the somewhat misleading example which was given (the Malta/ Maltese element toydreamer suggests), I think the question is tantamount to impossible.
For that reason (that the slimmest of slim chances might have got an answer) I will not ask for a point to be deducted from yamillah, but I think toydreamer’s answer came closest to being a viable solution, and deserves a point and the setting of the next brain-teaser.

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