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Sacrificing oneself for others in Tintin stories

RicardoOlcese
Member
#1 · Posted: 9 Jan 2019 18:19
It's a recurring topic, and an(other) inspiration of moral courage in Tintin. I can recall when captain Haddock tried to cut his rope in Tibet. Also when Wolf jumped into space. When our friends travelled to Tapiocapolis to rescue Castafiore. When they did the same to rescue Calculus in Borduria. Also in Shooting Star, when they were willing to lose the race in order to respond to a (fake) SOS from another ship. Can you think of another act of altruism in Tintin? I think it's a nice moral lesson given to all readers, especially the younger ones.
snowybella
Member
#2 · Posted: 10 Jan 2019 01:58
Also in Tibet, Tintin rescues the drunken Snowy from being swept away in the river - I wouldn't say racing down a rocky mountain and then running down a fragile wooden bridge would be the safest of actions. Snowy then repays this dept by being willing to wait, and possibly freeze, by the place where Tintin falls into the crevasse later on in the book.
mct16
Member
#3 · Posted: 10 Jan 2019 22:55
In "Shooting Star", there is the scene earlier in the story when Professor Phostle thinks that predicting the end of the world will make him famous! and, when it does not occur, furiously takes it out on his assistant.

In a rather twisted way, he seems to consider the sacrifice of the world as a small thing compared to the price of fame! Fortunately he matures a little during the journey to the meteorite.

There is also Zorrino in "Prisoners of the Sun". He is guiding white men to the Temple of the Sun; the Incas consider white men as their natural enemies so Zorrino is a traitor for guiding them. He knows this (at the bridge he tells Tintin that he will die if the local Indians see Zorrino talking to him) so he taking a big risk.

In the same story, Tintin guesses that the sacred medallion will protect whoever holds it and gives it to Zorrino, thus giving up any chance of his own survival.
Shivam302001
Member
#4 · Posted: 17 Jan 2019 14:41
There is also Mr.Wang's son who was committed to save Tintin in China, despite the great risks he was taking himself (which ultimately led to him becoming mad).

Also, the topic name suggests that I also suggest that event in the Moon rocket when Tintin volunteered to give one of the Thom(p)sons his berth in the rocket.
mct16
Member
#5 · Posted: 24 Jan 2019 01:05
Shivam302001:
Also, the topic name suggests that I also suggest that event in the Moon rocket when Tintin volunteered to give one of the Thom(p)sons his berth in the rocket.

I would not quite call that a sacrifice - in the context of someone risking their life - more of a courtesy. It could be seen as Tintin's way of raising the issue that they only have four berths for six people.
Shivam302001
Member
#6 · Posted: 24 Jan 2019 04:16
mct16

I don't quite see your point. Do you mean to say that only those sacrifices count where one has to give up one's lives for others as the others have given apt examples above? Well, then surely, my example does not count.

But if you see the smaller aspect, Tintin was willing to sacrifice his berth (and a pretty important one at that) without thinking about where he would lie down or be safe. If you go by the dictionary meaning, then that should be considered a sacrifice.

I would not just say that Tintin just raised the topic of a shortage of berths. It could rather be he raised the topic and sacrificed his berth in the same breath.
mct16
Member
#7 · Posted: 24 Jan 2019 11:14 · Edited by: mct16
I have known situations in which people make suggestions off the top of their heads just in order to get a discussion started - often suggesting that they will do the awkward part - out of courtesy and the hope that a more practical solution will be found. I think that Tintin is doing something like that when he offers to give up his berth even though he wonders how he will manage the moon landing - unaware that Calculus has already figured out a solution. Notice how he gets cut off in mid-sentence before he can elaborate.

I also love the next panel in which Calculus in effect puts an awkward-looking Tintin in his place, like a manager to an employee - "It is not up to you to decide whose berth is whose. You have been assigned to one and you will stick to it. Leave the decisions to someone more senior!"
Shivam302001
Member
#8 · Posted: 24 Jan 2019 13:40 · Edited by: Shivam302001
mct16

Maybe, but I think we are thinking too much of a situation. There were extra people on board, Tintin volunteered to give up his berth and the Professor had different plans. Tintin may have just said it to get an answer from others or may have just as well made the suggestion honestly, we have no point in dwelling in the unknown. What we know is that he did suggest it, and personally, quite personally, I believe that he really meant it.

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