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Jo, Zette & Jocko: The Secret Ray - some observations

Charles
Member
#1 · Posted: 26 Apr 2005 09:04
Note: I realize these things may sound sort of random, but please bear with me!

First, the story strikes me as one of the most sinister that Hergé ever drew and wrote.
Not only do the main characters face numerous attempts on their lives, they are children. This fact adds a very dark twist to the story; it's one thing for Rastapopoulos to try to kill Tintin (they're both men and Tintin is a threat to Rastapopoulos's evil schemes), but it's another for the Professor to spend much of the 116-page story trying to eliminate Jo and Zette (who are defenseless children who probably wouldn't be believed when they told their story).

Second: there are a lot of frames that remind me of Destination Moon, especially those on pages 25-33 (the vast labyrinth of laboratories filled with gigantic and mysterious equipment).

Just some thoughts for Tintinologists and Hergéologists better than I... ;)
jockosjungle
Member
#2 · Posted: 26 Apr 2005 16:49
Yes the Doctor from the Secret Ray is easily one of the most evil men in a Hergé adventure. I think he's meant to be more of a stereotype evil genius in a cartoony way that perhaps Rastapopoulos was meant to be.


Rik
Charles
Member
#3 · Posted: 3 May 2005 04:05
Do my observations about Destination Moon make any sense? Did Herge take as much interest in technical matters in JZ&J as he did for Tintin?
jockosjungle
Member
#4 · Posted: 3 May 2005 06:15
The Secret Ray was quite early on, although he was starting to get more technical with his designs and ideas I don't believe there was the depth of technicality present that was there in Destination Moon although the undersea lab is very much like the facility at Sprodj but then again I'd say that was the standard design for a military/scientific building at the time

Rik
Spinner
Member
#5 · Posted: 7 Jun 2005 12:42
First, the story strikes me as one of the most sinister that Herge ever drew and wrote: not only do the main characters face numerous attempts on their lives, they are children.

I'd have to agree with you there. I remember reading it in French as a child, and it disturbed me for a period of time in a way I don't think I had ever experienced, or have since experienced, with Hergé's other work.

While I would recommend it to all Hergé enthusiasts, I wouldn't recommend it to children!

Incidentally, it's my first post hre, so please set me straight if I'm committing any frightful faux pas...
jockosjungle
Member
#6 · Posted: 11 Jun 2005 20:37
Well I only read it recently and it was quite disturbing. Many of Tintin's enemies would definitely think twice before harming two children and a dog.

Maybe living under the sea addled his brain a bit but obviously some of the crew had some compassion for rescuing them in the first place

Rik
Danagasta
Member
#7 · Posted: 14 Jul 2005 17:16
It seems like those adventures were supposed to be more comical and silly, whereas Tintin is supposed to be much more serious. I don't understand how it's disturbing, though---read the AP wire each day, now THAT is disturbing and REAL to boot! Also, we're talking about kids who see thousands of acts of violence on TV. I think they can read between the lines regarding a comic.
Courtney
jockosjungle
Member
#8 · Posted: 15 Jul 2005 16:04
Have you read it Courtney?

It isn't THAT disturbing admittedly, but most bad guys would draw the line at hurting children, whereas the Scientist in The Secret Ray did not.

Rik
Charles
Member
#9 · Posted: 24 Jul 2005 01:28
Frankly, JZ&J seems more like the newswires than Tintin. I, for one, have a hard time pitying Tintin -- he has so much strength, both physical strength and strength of character, and so much courage, that it is hard to be truly in fear for his safety. Yes, anxiety and suspense are an essential part of the Tintin stories, please don't misunderstand me, but Jo, Zette, and Jocko really are very vulnerable and inspire more pathos than Tintin, who seems to specialize in ethos and logos.
heruursmith
Member
#10 · Posted: 12 Oct 2005 04:05 · Edited by: heruursmith
One of the most shocking (for me at least) frames that I've ever seen in a comic book by Herge is the one in "Mr Pump's Legacy" page 17 that show's an adult hand pointing a pistol at Jo's head as he runs away.

Seeing a picture (even a drawing) of a gun pointed at a child is pretty horrific, especially when the trigger is pulled like it is in this story...

Kam

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